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Book cover: Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations

ISSN: 0742-6186
Series editor(s): David Lewin and Paul Gollan

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

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Interunion Conflict in a Non-Exclusive, Non-Majority Representation Regime: New Zealand Lessons for Union Revival in the United States


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Title:Interunion Conflict in a Non-Exclusive, Non-Majority Representation Regime: New Zealand Lessons for Union Revival in the United States
Author(s):Mark Harcourt, Helen Lam
Volume:20 Editor(s): David Lewin, Paul J. Gollan ISBN: 978-1-78190-377-3 eISBN: 978-1-78190-378-0
Citation:Mark Harcourt, Helen Lam (2012), Interunion Conflict in a Non-Exclusive, Non-Majority Representation Regime: New Zealand Lessons for Union Revival in the United States, in David Lewin, Paul J. Gollan (ed.) Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations (Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations, Volume 20), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.161-187
DOI:10.1108/S0742-6186(2012)0000020009 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:A “new” interpretation of Section 7 in the National Labor Relations Act could serve as the basis of union renewal, in enabling and supporting non-majority, non-exclusive representation as an alternative to the difficulties of union certification. One potential shortcoming of this form of representation is interunion conflict associated with ongoing competition between unions trying to attract each other's members in the same bargaining units. However, interview evidence collected from union executives in New Zealand, where non-majority, non-exclusive representation already exists, suggests that such conflict is normally limited. Focusing representation on areas that make the most sense (for both unions and workers) and following union federation protocols, when conflicts occur, have both contributed to the overall low conflict level. Lessons for US unionism are explored.

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