Search
  Advanced Search
 
Chapter search
Book cover: Studies in Symbolic Interaction

Studies in Symbolic Interaction

ISSN: 0163-2396
Series editor(s): Professor Norman Denzin

Subject Area: Sociology and Public Policy

Content: Series Volumes | icon: RSS Current Volume RSS

 

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

Document request:
WHO ARE YOU: PETE TOWNSHEND, “GOING SOLO,” AND THE POSTMODERN SEARCH FOR SELF IN ROCK MUSIC


Document Information:
Title:WHO ARE YOU: PETE TOWNSHEND, “GOING SOLO,” AND THE POSTMODERN SEARCH FOR SELF IN ROCK MUSIC
Author(s):Daniel Dotter
Volume:28 Editor(s): Norman K. Denzin ISBN: 978-0-7623-1186-6 eISBN: 978-1-84950-332-7
Citation:Daniel Dotter (2005), WHO ARE YOU: PETE TOWNSHEND, “GOING SOLO,” AND THE POSTMODERN SEARCH FOR SELF IN ROCK MUSIC, in Norman K. Denzin (ed.) 28 (Studies in Symbolic Interaction, Volume 28), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.255-281
DOI:10.1016/S0163-2396(04)28021-8 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:This paper has two purposes. First, I offer a reading of interpretive biography (Denzin, 1989a) as an alternative method for understanding how individual lives are rendered meaningful in postmodern communication processes. Second, given the importance of many rock performers as cultural heroes, I present an interpretive biography of Pete Townshend, chief songwriter and most visible member of the classic rock band the Who. This method of inquiry is grounded in the more general tradition of interpretive interactionism (Denzin, 1989b, 1990a) and has its roots in C. Wright Mills's (1959) concept of the sociological imagination. Its guiding question is this: How is the postmodern self (or stated more accurately, selves) created within and sustained by the mass media? I argue that as postmodern cultural symbols, Townshend and the band (however ambiguously) mirror a collective search for identity on the part of audiences and society-at-large.

Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?

- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (168kb)

Due to our platform migration, pay-per-view is temporarily unavailable.

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions