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Book cover: Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations

ISSN: 0742-6186
Series editor(s): David Lewin and Paul Gollan

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

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THE TRANSFER OF IDEAS IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: DUNLOP AND OXFORD IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS THOUGHT, 1960–1985


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Title:THE TRANSFER OF IDEAS IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: DUNLOP AND OXFORD IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS THOUGHT, 1960–1985
Author(s):Diana Kelly
Volume:13 ISBN: 978-0-76231-152-1 eISBN: 978-1-84950-305-1
Citation:Diana Kelly (2004), THE TRANSFER OF IDEAS IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: DUNLOP AND OXFORD IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS THOUGHT, 1960–1985, in (ed.) 13 (Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations, Volume 13), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.245-273
DOI:10.1016/S0742-6186(04)13008-4 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:The primary objective of this paper is to understand the extent to which Australian industrial relations academics took up the different heuristic frameworks from USA and U.K. from the 1960s to the 1980s. A second objective is to begin to understand why, and in what ways ideas are transmitted in academic disciplines drawing on a “market model” for ideas. It is shown that in the years between 1960s and 1980s a modified U.S. (Dunlopian) model of interpreting industrial relations became more influential in Australia than that of U.K. scholarship, as exemplified by the British Oxford School. In part this reflects the breadth, flexibility and absence of an overt normative tenor in Dunlop’s model which thus offered lower transaction costs for scholars in an emergent discipline seeking recognition and approval from academia, practitioners and policy-makers. Despite frequent and wide-ranging criticism of Dunlop’s model, it proved a far more enduring transfer to Australian academic industrial relations than the British model, albeit in a distorted form. The market model for the diffusion of ideas illuminates the ways in which a variety of local contextual factors influenced the choices taken by Australian industrial relations academics.

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