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Book cover: Advances in Group Processes

Advances in Group Processes

ISSN: 0882-6145
Series editor(s): Shane R. Thye and Edward Lawler

Subject Area: Sociology and Public Policy

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Status Processes and Gender Differences in Self-Handicapping


Document Information:
Title:Status Processes and Gender Differences in Self-Handicapping
Author(s):Jeffrey W. Lucas, Heather Ridolfo, Reef Youngreen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Layana Navarre-Jackson, Michael J. Lovaglia
Volume:24 Editor(s): Shelley J. Correll ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0 eISBN: 978-1-84950-496-6
Citation:Jeffrey W. Lucas, Heather Ridolfo, Reef Youngreen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Layana Navarre-Jackson, Michael J. Lovaglia (2007), Status Processes and Gender Differences in Self-Handicapping, in Shelley J. Correll (ed.) Social Psychology of Gender (Advances in Group Processes, Volume 24), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.261-281
DOI:10.1016/S0882-6145(07)24010-X (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender socialization and status processes suggest two potential explanations for the consistent finding that men self-handicap more than women. If status differences contribute to the tendency to self-handicap, then holding gender constant, those with high status on other characteristics would self-handicap more than those with low status. In Study 1, men assigned to high-status positions selected less study time (and thus self-handicapped more) than did men assigned to low-status positions. Women assigned high status, however, self-handicapped no more than did women assigned low status. Because study time as a measure of self-handicapping may be confounded with confidence or motivation, a second study assigned status and measured self-handicapping by the selection of performance-enhancing or -detracting music. Study 2 also found that high status increased self-handicapping among men but not among women. Both gender socialization and status processes may play roles in self-handicapping.

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