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Book cover: Sociology of Crime Law and Deviance

Sociology of Crime Law and Deviance

ISSN: 1521-6136
Series editor(s): Professor Mathieu Deflem

Subject Area: Sociology and Public Policy

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Employment, Unemployment, and Rates of Intimate Partner Violence: Evidence from the National Crime Victim Surveys


Document Information:
Title:Employment, Unemployment, and Rates of Intimate Partner Violence: Evidence from the National Crime Victim Surveys
Author(s):Richard R. Peterson
Volume:16 Editor(s): Mathieu Deflem ISBN: 978-0-85724-801-5 eISBN: 978-0-85724-802-2
Citation:Richard R. Peterson (2011), Employment, Unemployment, and Rates of Intimate Partner Violence: Evidence from the National Crime Victim Surveys, in Mathieu Deflem (ed.) Economic Crisis and Crime (Sociology of Crime Law and Deviance, Volume 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.171-193
DOI:10.1108/S1521-6136(2011)0000016012 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:Although the news media have speculated that the current recession has increased rates of intimate partner violence, there is no reliable evidence supporting that claim. Moreover, no well-designed studies have examined the impact of prior recessions. This chapter considers whether rising employment during a period of economic growth reduces intimate partner violence. The findings on the effect of economic growth are used to assess the likely impact of economic decline on rates of intimate partner violence. Using data from the National Crime Victim Surveys, the analyses examine both macro-level trends and individual-level effects. At the macro-level, men's and women's unemployment rates were only weakly related to rates of intimate partner violence. The individual-level results show that rising rates of employment during a period of economic growth were not responsible for producing declines in intimate partner violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that the current recession will not increase rates of intimate partner violence against women.

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