Search
  Advanced Search
 
Chapter search
Book cover: Advances in Special Education

Advances in Special Education

ISSN: 0270-4013
Series editor(s): Dr Anthony Rotatori

Subject Area: Education

Content: Series Volumes | icon: RSS Current Volume RSS

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

Document request:
Chapter 9 The general education classroom: This is not where students with disabilities should be placed


Document Information:
Title:Chapter 9 The general education classroom: This is not where students with disabilities should be placed
Author(s):Jeffrey P. Bakken
Volume:19 Editor(s): Festus E. Obiakor, Jeffrey P. Bakken, Anthony F. Rotatori ISBN: 978-1-84855-668-3 eISBN: 978-1-84855-669-0
Citation:Jeffrey P. Bakken (2009), Chapter 9 The general education classroom: This is not where students with disabilities should be placed, in Festus E. Obiakor, Jeffrey P. Bakken, Anthony F. Rotatori (ed.) Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Identification, Assessment and Instruction (Advances in Special Education, Volume 19), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.129-139
DOI:10.1108/S0270-4013(2010)0000019012 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Extract:

Before discussing educational placement issues related to learners with special needs, definitions related to inclusion need to be presented. It is important to note there is no universally accepted definition of inclusion; thus, this term holds different meanings to different individuals (Fuchs & Fuchs, 1994). Furthermore, the terminology has also changed over the decades (McLeskey, 2007). During the 1960s through the early 1980s, the term mainstreaming was used. The terms of integration and regular education initiative were used throughout the 1980s. From the late 1980s through the present, the preferable term has been inclusion. Schwartz (2005) optimistically stated that an inclusive program is “one that provides educational intervention to students with and without disabilities in a common setting and provides appropriate levels of instruction and support to meet the needs of all students” (p. 240). Others have defined inclusion “as the practice of educating students with disabilities in the general education classroom setting” (Zinkil & Gilbert, 2000, p. 225). The meaning of inclusion has been defined differently from the term mainstreaming, which has been defined as “when students…earn their way into the general educational classroom…with minimal, if any, special education assistance” (Zinkil & Gilbert, 2000, p. 225). For the purposes of this chapter, the definition of inclusion provided by Zinkil and Gilbert (2000) will be used.


Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?

- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (114kb)
Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions