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Book cover: Research in the Sociology of Work

Research in the Sociology of Work

ISSN: 0277-2833
Series editor(s): Lisa A. Keister

Subject Area: Sociology and Public Policy

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Document request:
Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes


Document Information:
Title:Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes
Author(s):Henrich R. Greve, Marc-David L. Seidel
Volume:25 Editor(s): Henrich R. Greve, Marc-David L. Seidel ISBN: 978-1-78350-571-5 eISBN: 978-1-78350-572-2
Citation:Henrich R. Greve, Marc-David L. Seidel (2014), Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes, in Henrich R. Greve, Marc-David L. Seidel (ed.) Adolescent Experiences and Adult Work Outcomes: Connections and Causes (Research in the Sociology of Work, Volume 25), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.1-10
DOI:10.1108/S0277-283320140000025001 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Extract:

Michel Anteby (Harvard) and Amy Wrzesniewski (Yale) in their piece entitled, “In Search of the Self at Work: Young Adults' Experiences of a Dual identity Organization” examine the multiple forces that shape the adolescent and young adult identities and influence their subsequent career choices. They find that early work experiences are key among these forces in their study of a European youth service program aimed at “redirecting” future career choices. They find that participants focus on one of the organization’s dual identities largely to the exclusion of the other, creating a dynamic in which their interactions with members who focus on the other identity create challenges and dominate their experience, to the detriment of a focus on the organization and its goals. This suggests that a previously overlooked feature of youth service programs – their dual identity – might prove both a blessing for attracting many diverse members and a curse for achieving desired outcomes. They conclude that this identification process in a dual-identity organization limits the extent to which such organizations can truly impact future career choices, suggesting that even though these organizations are perceived as a means to influence future careers that they are potentially not the best way to do so, and that there may be a need to understand broader societal influences prior to entry to such an organization to best understand how to influence future career paths.


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