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Book cover: Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management

ISSN: 0742-7301
Series editor(s): Michael Buckley, Jonathon Halbesleben and Anthony R. Wheeler

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

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An Integration and Extension of Intrinsic Motivation Theories: The Role of Core Affect


Document Information:
Title:An Integration and Extension of Intrinsic Motivation Theories: The Role of Core Affect
Author(s):Matt Bloom, Amy E. Colbert
Volume:30 Editor(s): Aparna Joshi, Hui Liao, Joseph J. Martocchio ISBN: 978-0-85724-553-3 eISBN: 978-0-85724-554-0
Citation:Matt Bloom, Amy E. Colbert (2011), An Integration and Extension of Intrinsic Motivation Theories: The Role of Core Affect, in Aparna Joshi, Hui Liao, Joseph J. Martocchio (ed.) Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management (Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management, Volume 30), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.73-114
DOI:10.1108/S0742-7301(2011)0000030004 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:Intrinsic motivation occurs due to positive reactions that arise directly from engagement in work activities. Scholars have asserted that intrinsic motivation plays an important role in organizational phenomena such as creativity (George, 2007), leadership (Piccolo & Colquitt, 2006), and performance (Gagné & Deci, 2005). We review the research literature on intrinsic motivation and provide an overview and integration of the leading theories. We then develop a conceptual model in which positive affect serves as a primary cause of intrinsic motivation. We discuss how affect alone may induce intrinsic motivation, how affect may lead to nonconscious experiences of intrinsic motivation, and how affect and cognitions may work in concert to produce the strongest and most persistent intrinsic motivation experiences. We conclude by suggesting new avenues for research that might be pursued using this cognitive–affective model of intrinsic motivation.

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