Search
  Advanced Search
 
Chapter search
Book cover: Advances in Motivation and Achievement

Advances in Motivation and Achievement

ISSN: 0749-7423
Series editor(s): Stuart Karabenick and Timothy C. Urdan

Subject Area: Education

Content: Series Volumes | icon: RSS Current Volume RSS

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

Document request:
The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions


Document Information:
Title:The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions
Author(s):Maarten Vansteenkiste, Christopher P. Niemiec, Bart Soenens
Volume:16 Editor(s): Timothy C. Urdan, Stuart A. Karabenick ISBN: 978-0-85724-111-5 eISBN: 978-0-85724-112-2
Citation:Maarten Vansteenkiste, Christopher P. Niemiec, Bart Soenens (2010), The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions, in Timothy C. Urdan, Stuart A. Karabenick (ed.) The Decade Ahead: Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement (Advances in Motivation and Achievement, Volume 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.105-165
DOI:10.1108/S0749-7423(2010)000016A007 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Extract:

Cognitive evaluation theory (CET; Deci, 1975), SDT's first mini-theory, was built from research on the dynamic interplay between external events (e.g., rewards, choice) and people's task interest or enjoyment – that is, intrinsic motivation (IM). At the time, this research was quite controversial, as operant theory (Skinner, 1971) had dominated the psychological landscape. The central assumption of operant theory was that reinforcement contingencies in the environment control behavior, which precluded the existence of inherently satisfying activities performed for non-separable outcomes. During this time, Deci proposed that people – by nature – possess intrinsic motivation (IM), which can manifest as engagement in curiosity-based behaviors, discovery of new perspectives, and seeking out optimal challenges (see also Harlow, 1953; White, 1959). IM thus represents a manifestation of the organismic growth tendency and is readily observed in infants' and toddlers' exploratory behavior and play. Operationally, an intrinsically motivated activity is performed for its own sake – that is, the behavior is experienced as inherently satisfying. From an attributional perspective (deCharms, 1968), such behaviors have an internal perceived locus of causality, as people perceive their behavior as emanating from their sense of self, rather than from experiences of control or coercion.


Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?

- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (406kb)
Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions