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Book cover: Advances in Motivation and Achievement

Advances in Motivation and Achievement

ISSN: 0749-7423
Series editor(s): Stuart Karabenick and Timothy C. Urdan

Subject Area: Education

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Why race matters: social context and achievement motivation in African American youth


Document Information:
Title:Why race matters: social context and achievement motivation in African American youth
Author(s):Dana Wood, Sandra Graham
Volume:16 Editor(s): Timothy C. Urdan, Stuart A. Karabenick ISBN: 978-0-85724-253-2 eISBN: 978-0-85724-254-9
Citation:Dana Wood, Sandra Graham (2010), Why race matters: social context and achievement motivation in African American youth, in Timothy C. Urdan, Stuart A. Karabenick (ed.) The Decade Ahead: Applications and Contexts of Motivation and Achievement (Advances in Motivation and Achievement, Volume 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.175-209
DOI:10.1108/S0749-7423(2010)000016B009 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Extract:

Discrimination is defined as negative or harmful behavior toward a person because of his or her membership in a particular group (see Jones, 1997). Unfortunately, experiences with discrimination due to racial group membership appear to be a normal part of development for African American youth. Discrimination experiences occur within a variety of social contexts, including school, peer, and community contexts, and with increasing frequency as youth move across the adolescent years (Fisher, Wallace, & Fenton, 2000; Seaton et al., 2008). Recent research with a nationally representative sample of African American 13–17-year olds revealed that 87% had experienced at least one racially discriminatory event during the preceding year (Seaton et al., 2008). Most of the research on the consequences of youths’ encounters with racial discrimination has focused on mental health outcomes (Cooper, McLoyd, Wood, & Hardaway, 2008), with surprisingly little work examining whether and through what mechanisms discrimination affects achievement motivation.


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