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Book cover: Research in Occupational Stress and Well-being

Research in Occupational Stress and Well-being

ISSN: 1479-3555
Series editor(s): Professor Pamela Perrewé, Dr Jonathon Halbesleben and Dr Chris Rosen

Subject Area: Health Care Management/Healthcare

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Information and communication technology: Implications for job stress and employee well-being


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Title:Information and communication technology: Implications for job stress and employee well-being
Author(s):Arla Day, Natasha Scott, E. Kevin Kelloway
Volume:8 Editor(s): Pamela L. Perrewé, Daniel C. Ganster ISBN: 978-1-84950-712-7 eISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4
Citation:Arla Day, Natasha Scott, E. Kevin Kelloway (2010), Information and communication technology: Implications for job stress and employee well-being, in Pamela L. Perrewé, Daniel C. Ganster (ed.) New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress (Research in Occupational Stress and Well-being, Volume 8), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.317-350
DOI:10.1108/S1479-3555(2010)0000008011 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Chapter Item
Abstract:In this chapter, we use the job demands–resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti, Bakker, Nachreiner, & Schaufeli, 2001) and the transactional model of stress (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984) to provide a theoretical framework with which to examine information and communication technology (ICT) as both a demand and a resource. We review specific characteristics of ICT that may either increase or decrease employee stress and well-being. Specifically, we examine the extent that ICT increases accessibility of workers and access to information, the extent to which it improves communication and control over one's job and life, and the extent to which it is used to monitor employees or provide feedback. Finally, we examine the organizational, job, and individual factors that may mitigate or exacerbate the impact of ICT demands on individual outcomes.

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