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Book cover: Advances in Human Performance and Cognitive Engineering Research

Advances in Human Performance and Cognitive Engineering Research

ISSN: 1479-3601
Series editor(s): Professor Eduardo Salas

Subject Area: Health Care Management/Healthcare

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Preface: Why Human Factors of “Unmanned” Systems?


Document Information:
Title:Preface: Why Human Factors of “Unmanned” Systems?
Author(s):Nancy J. Cooke
Volume:7 Editor(s): Nancy J. Cooke, Heather L. Pringle, Harry K. Pedersen, Olena Connor ISBN: 978-0-76231-247-4 eISBN: 978-1-84950-370-9
Citation:Nancy J. Cooke (2006), Preface: Why Human Factors of “Unmanned” Systems?, in Nancy J. Cooke, Heather L. Pringle, Harry K. Pedersen, Olena Connor (ed.) Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles (Advances in Human Performance and Cognitive Engineering Research, Volume 7), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.xvii-xxii
DOI:10.1016/S1479-3601(05)07030-X (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Article type:Editorial
Extract:

UAVs or unmanned (or the more politically correct, “unpiloted” or “uninhabited”) Aerial Vehicles and the broader class of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) have attracted much attention lately from the military, as well as the general public. Generally, ROVs are vehicles that do not carry human pilots or operators, but instead are controlled remotely with different degrees of autonomy on the part of the vehicle. The role of UAVs in the military has rapidly expanded over the years such that every branch of the U.S. military deploys some form of UAV in their intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance operations. Recent U.S. military successes include a USAF Predator UAV operating in Iraq, but piloted by a team at Nellis AFB (now Creech AFB) in Las Vegas, Nevada, which successfully aided in finding Saddam Hussein (Rogers, 2004). Another more recent example took place in August 2004 when a Predator UAV armed with Hellfire missiles, also controlled from Nellis AFB, rescued a group of U.S. Marines pinned down by sniper fire in Najaf, Iraq (CNN, 2005). The value of UAVs is recognized by other nations as well who have active UAV programs including, but not limited to, Germany, England, China, France, Canada, South Africa, and Israel.


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