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0The damned dam
Author(s):Surajit Ghosh Dastidar, Sindhuja Menon, Arundhati Dutta
Title – The damned dam. Subject area – Power and politics. Study level/applicability – This case is suitable for all levels of students, undergraduate MBA to Executive MBA classes and practitioners. Assignment questions are designed from the perspective of teaching this case to a business student audience. Case overview – Read more
Title – The damned dam. Subject area – Power and politics. Study level/applicability – This case is suitable for all levels of students, undergraduate MBA to Executive MBA classes and practitioners. Assignment questions are designed from the perspective of teaching this case to a business student audience. Case overview – A raging dispute between Kerala and Tamil Nadu over the 116-year-old Mullaperiyar Dam was in the national spotlight after mild tremors shook nearby areas. The Mullaperiyar Dam was located in Idukki district of Kerala in India. The dam was filled to its maximum permissible level of 136?ft. Tamil Nadu wanted the storage capacity to be increased by raising the dam height from 136?ft (41.5?m) to 142?ft (43?m) as per a 2006 Supreme Court directive to meet the growing irrigation needs of the state. The dam was vital for people living in the drought-prone districts of Theni, Dindigul, Madurai, Sivagangai and Ramanathapuram of Tamil Nadu. It irrigated about 220,000 acres and supplied drinking water to Madurai city and several towns. Kerala on the other hand wants a new dam as it feared that a strong earthquake might damage the existing dam. Chief Minister of Kerala, Oommen Chandy said: “I strongly believe that only a new dam can provide safety to the people of Kerala. We are only concerned about the safety of the people. But, unfortunately, there is a feeling in Tamil Nadu that the situation of panic here is a created one. That is not at all correct”. However, Tamil Nadu Government said the dam was safe as it had undergone periodic repairs during 1980-1994 with Kerala Government's approval. With the Kerala Government screaming loud over the danger that could be caused by the alleged obsolete 116?year old Mullaperiyar Dam on safety grounds of people who live downstream, why is Tamil Nadu defiant on any debate that cites the decommission of the controversial dam? Is the Tamil Nadu Government overlooking the issue for its personal benefits by putting the lives of 3?million people at stake? Expected learning outcomes – The case would fit in a course for power and politics. It would also be appropriate for a modular course on regional development planning. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
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1City Developments Limited: a journey in sustainable business development
Author(s):Hwang Soo Chiat, Havovi Joshi
Title – City Developments Limited: a journey in sustainable business development. Subject area – Business development, sustainable business practices, corporate social responsibility. Study level/applicability – Executive education, postgraduate, undergraduate. Case overview – City Developments Limited (CDL) is one of Singapore's leading international property and hotel conglomerates, involved in real estate Read more
Title – City Developments Limited: a journey in sustainable business development. Subject area – Business development, sustainable business practices, corporate social responsibility. Study level/applicability – Executive education, postgraduate, undergraduate. Case overview – City Developments Limited (CDL) is one of Singapore's leading international property and hotel conglomerates, involved in real estate development and investment, hotel ownership and management, facilities management and the provision of hospitality solutions. The group has developed over 22,000 luxurious and quality homes in Singapore, catering to a wide range of market segments. CDL is widely recognised as a champion of sustainable practices in Singapore. It was the first company honoured with the President's Social Service Award and President's Award for the Environment in 2007. It was also the only developer to be accorded the Built Environment Leadership Platinum Award in 2009 and Green Mark Platinum Champion Award in 2011 by the Building and Construction Authority, the governing authority for Singapore's built environment. CDL was the first Singaporean company to be listed on all three of the world's top sustainability benchmarks – FTSE4Good Index Series since 2002, Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World since 2010 and the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes since 2011. This case discusses the many factors that have enabled CDL to successfully manage its journey in sustainable business development. It also creates an opportunity for students to discuss other steps or measures the company could take to further increase stakeholders' awareness and adoption of their sustainability vision. Expected learning outcomes – This case discusses the concepts of sustainability and the reasons why companies believe in following sustainable practices. Through this case, students would get an opportunity to discuss the sustainable practices adopted by one of the well-known Singapore companies, CDL. They would understand the costs and benefits of being a champion of CSR, the benefits to the stakeholders of CDL, and the ways CSR provides a competitive advantage. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
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2Sustainability as an imperative and an opportunity: the case of Infosys Limited
Author(s):Saji K. Mathew, Thillai Rajan
Title – Sustainability as an imperative and an opportunity: the case of Infosys Limited. Subject area – This case provides useful material for discussion on topics such as sustainability, business continuity, corporate social responsibility and green IT. Study level/applicability – The case could be used in different areas of business Read more
Title – Sustainability as an imperative and an opportunity: the case of Infosys Limited. Subject area – This case provides useful material for discussion on topics such as sustainability, business continuity, corporate social responsibility and green IT. Study level/applicability – The case could be used in different areas of business management such as general management, information systems and business strategy. Case overview – The case presents the progressive evolution of Infosys Limited from its beginnings through different stages of innovation and consolidation in the IT services industry. Senior executives at Infosys believe that the sustainability initiative at Infosys is not a new movement, but a logical extension of the company's long standing commitment to society and environment. Sustainability was a key agenda at Infosys and it was deeply ingrained in the company's ethos and the way in which it operated. The case also articulates the company's commitment to sustainability as evidenced by the involvement of the top management in providing leadership. From an academic standpoint the case provides pointers to look at how the IT services industry has responded to sustainability practices and how sustainability practices are different or similar across various firms. Expected learning outcomes – The case can help students to answer the following questions: How is sustainability different from corporate social responsibility? What is the context in which Infosys' attention turned towards sustainability? How is top management involved in Infosys' sustainability initiative? What are the elements of Infosys' sustainability strategy? How does it build on its core strengths? What are the structural mechanisms the company has provided to implement its sustainability strategy? What internal challenges to change while implementing green solutions were foreseen and overcome by Infosys? How competitive is Infosys' sustainability practices with respect to its competitors? How does it help the company in competing in the market? Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
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3To die with dignity – hospice care for the poor in India
Author(s):Shyam Kamath, Jyoti Bachani
Title – To die with dignity – hospice care for the poor in India. Subject area – Non-profit management and corporate strategy. Study level/applicability – The case is appropriate for teaching undergraduate students, executive MBAs and graduate students. The case is useful for an overview of hospice and palliative care Read more
Title – To die with dignity – hospice care for the poor in India. Subject area – Non-profit management and corporate strategy. Study level/applicability – The case is appropriate for teaching undergraduate students, executive MBAs and graduate students. The case is useful for an overview of hospice and palliative care in the developed and developing world, and for class room discussions of external analysis of non-profit organizations' ecosystems, funding needs and industry analysis. Case overview – Hospice care in the developed parts of the world is well established but in most developing countries, there are no organized hospice care facilities. This case focuses on a charitable organization, Brthya – Add Value to Life (Brthya – AVTL), that established and operates hospice care in Chennai, India. The Indian context for hospice care, and the ecosystem needed to sustain ongoing operations, are described along with a summary of four different models of hospice care used in other parts of the world. Expected learning outcomes – The case will help students to understand: what hospice care is and its various forms; management issues related to funding and operating hospice care in particular and a non-profit in general; ecosystems that make non-profits sustainable in emerging economies; and managing expansion and growth in non-profit organizations, in emerging economies and globally. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available; please consult your librarian for access. Close
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4GOONJ: the power of cloth
Author(s):Krishnadas Nanath
Title – GOONJ: the power of cloth. Subject area – Strategic management and social innovation Study level/applicability – Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in strategic management and social innovation courses. Case overview – GOONJ is a non-profit organization which has life and dignity for Read more
Title – GOONJ: the power of cloth. Subject area – Strategic management and social innovation Study level/applicability – Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in strategic management and social innovation courses. Case overview – GOONJ is a non-profit organization which has life and dignity for lakhs of people in India over the last decade. It aimed at bringing up clothing as one of the important aspects of human life and make it available for the needy keeping their dignity intact. The case begins with Anshu Gupta, founder of GOONJ thinking deeply about the high-priority meeting to take GOONJ to the next level and scale up the operations of his social innovation. It then tries to bring up the potential problem of clothing and menstrual hygiene in India followed by explanation of the present working model of GOONJ which allows them to manage the operations with 97 paisa per cloth. With the dream of taking GOONJ to the next level and converting it into a nation-wide phenomenon, will the present model work? Expected learning outcomes – This case will cover two important aspects: social innovation process (themes, challenges and implications for practice); and strategic management concepts (stakeholder theory, internal-external factor evaluation). Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
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1City Developments Limited: a journey in sustainable business development
Author(s):Hwang Soo Chiat, Havovi Joshi
Title – City Developments Limited: a journey in sustainable business development. Subject area – Business development, sustainable business practices, corporate social responsibility. Study level/applicability – Executive education, postgraduate, undergraduate. Case overview – City Developments Limited (CDL) is one of Singapore's leading international property and hotel conglomerates, involved in real estate development and investment, hotel ownership and management, facilities management and the provision of hospitality solutions. The group has developed over 22,000 luxurious and quality homes in Singapore, catering to a wide range of market segments. CDL is widely recognised as a champion of sustainable practices in Singapore. It was the first company honoured with the President's Social Service Award and President's Award for the Environment in 2007. It was also the only developer to be accorded the Built Environment Leadership Platinum Award in 2009 and Green Mark Platinum Champion Award in 2011 by the Building and Construction Authority, the governing authority for Singapore's built environment. CDL was the first Singaporean company to be listed on all three of the world's top sustainability benchmarks – FTSE4Good Index Series since 2002, Global 100 Most Sustainable Corporations in the World since 2010 and the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes since 2011. This case discusses the many factors that have enabled CDL to successfully manage its journey in sustainable business development. It also creates an opportunity for students to discuss other steps or measures the company could take to further increase stakeholders' awareness and adoption of their sustainability vision. Expected learning outcomes – This case discusses the concepts of sustainability and the reasons why companies believe in following sustainable practices. Through this case, students would get an opportunity to discuss the sustainable practices adopted by one of the well-known Singapore companies, CDL. They would understand the costs and benefits of being a champion of CSR, the benefits to the stakeholders of CDL, and the ways CSR provides a competitive advantage. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
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2Sustainability as an imperative and an opportunity: the case of Infosys Limited
Author(s):Saji K. Mathew, Thillai Rajan
Title – Sustainability as an imperative and an opportunity: the case of Infosys Limited. Subject area – This case provides useful material for discussion on topics such as sustainability, business continuity, corporate social responsibility and green IT. Study level/applicability – The case could be used in different areas of business management such as general management, information systems and business strategy. Case overview – The case presents the progressive evolution of Infosys Limited from its beginnings through different stages of innovation and consolidation in the IT services industry. Senior executives at Infosys believe that the sustainability initiative at Infosys is not a new movement, but a logical extension of the company's long standing commitment to society and environment. Sustainability was a key agenda at Infosys and it was deeply ingrained in the company's ethos and the way in which it operated. The case also articulates the company's commitment to sustainability as evidenced by the involvement of the top management in providing leadership. From an academic standpoint the case provides pointers to look at how the IT services industry has responded to sustainability practices and how sustainability practices are different or similar across various firms. Expected learning outcomes – The case can help students to answer the following questions: How is sustainability different from corporate social responsibility? What is the context in which Infosys' attention turned towards sustainability? How is top management involved in Infosys' sustainability initiative? What are the elements of Infosys' sustainability strategy? How does it build on its core strengths? What are the structural mechanisms the company has provided to implement its sustainability strategy? What internal challenges to change while implementing green solutions were foreseen and overcome by Infosys? How competitive is Infosys' sustainability practices with respect to its competitors? How does it help the company in competing in the market? Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
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3To die with dignity – hospice care for the poor in India
Author(s):Shyam Kamath, Jyoti Bachani
Title – To die with dignity – hospice care for the poor in India. Subject area – Non-profit management and corporate strategy. Study level/applicability – The case is appropriate for teaching undergraduate students, executive MBAs and graduate students. The case is useful for an overview of hospice and palliative care in the developed and developing world, and for class room discussions of external analysis of non-profit organizations' ecosystems, funding needs and industry analysis. Case overview – Hospice care in the developed parts of the world is well established but in most developing countries, there are no organized hospice care facilities. This case focuses on a charitable organization, Brthya – Add Value to Life (Brthya – AVTL), that established and operates hospice care in Chennai, India. The Indian context for hospice care, and the ecosystem needed to sustain ongoing operations, are described along with a summary of four different models of hospice care used in other parts of the world. Expected learning outcomes – The case will help students to understand: what hospice care is and its various forms; management issues related to funding and operating hospice care in particular and a non-profit in general; ecosystems that make non-profits sustainable in emerging economies; and managing expansion and growth in non-profit organizations, in emerging economies and globally. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available; please consult your librarian for access. Close
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4GOONJ: the power of cloth
Author(s):Krishnadas Nanath
Title – GOONJ: the power of cloth. Subject area – Strategic management and social innovation Study level/applicability – Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in strategic management and social innovation courses. Case overview – GOONJ is a non-profit organization which has life and dignity for lakhs of people in India over the last decade. It aimed at bringing up clothing as one of the important aspects of human life and make it available for the needy keeping their dignity intact. The case begins with Anshu Gupta, founder of GOONJ thinking deeply about the high-priority meeting to take GOONJ to the next level and scale up the operations of his social innovation. It then tries to bring up the potential problem of clothing and menstrual hygiene in India followed by explanation of the present working model of GOONJ which allows them to manage the operations with 97 paisa per cloth. With the dream of taking GOONJ to the next level and converting it into a nation-wide phenomenon, will the present model work? Expected learning outcomes – This case will cover two important aspects: social innovation process (themes, challenges and implications for practice); and strategic management concepts (stakeholder theory, internal-external factor evaluation). Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
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5Axel Springer's sustainability entrepreneurialism in Russian wood supply: just a CSR fad or real change in the makings?
Author(s):Nils Peters
Title – Axel Springer's sustainability entrepreneurialism in Russian wood supply: just a CSR fad or real change in the makings? Subject area – Entrepreneurship, Corporate sustainability, CSR, Supply chain. Study level/applicability – Master's courses: Entrepreneurship, Strategic management. Case overview – In 2002, potential risks deriving from emerging normative demands in the CSR debate prompted Axel Springer (AS) to rethink their supply chain strategy for Russian wood. Being one of the first movers in CSR in the publishing business, AS realized that current practices could spark future public discussion that might put pressure on AS, a key player in these supply chains. In early 2002, AS and one of their main suppliers, Stora Enso, started a joint initiative to redesign the supply chain processes in two of the major Russian logging regions to improve their social and ecological performance. Sometime later, other major players in the publishing sector as well as critical reviewers from several non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were invited to participate in the design of the new voluntary sustainability initiative called “Tikhvin Chalna project”, the second phase of which was accomplished by the end of 2006. Expected learning outcomes – Learn that organizations (specifically high-brand owners) are responsible for practices within their entire supply chains (social as well as environmental performance). Explore proactive corporate sustainability, CSR strategies are market but also institutional driven; Strategizing involves forming and transforming the rules, norms and standard models of customers as well as institutions such as NGOs or governmental bodies. Whether the initiator of such strategy is successful in increasing or manipulating demands is dependent on its resources and capabilities as well as on its network position. The case supports students in understanding resources being used to successfully transform or create institutional arrangements. Discover that the value of a business' relationships and its network position. Supplementary materials – Teaching note, Video files Close
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6EnviroServe: The Green Company in the UAE
Author(s):Gwendolyn Rodrigues, Vineetha Mathew
Title – EnviroServe: The Green Company in the UAE. Subject area – Reverse logistics, environment, CSR. Study level/applicability – Bachelor and Graduate students. Case overview – This case describes the role played by the company in linking various processes and taking the lead in the development of a unique “circular” flow of recycling activity which includes recovery, reuse and recycling schemes. Traditionally businesses were not held responsible for the product after use by the consumer. But, with growing stakeholder expectations in the area of corporate social responsibility and sustainability, businesses are more conscious about managing their social and environmental impacts. Today businesses are beginning to look at reverse logistics not only in terms of economic impacts but also environmental impacts. While consumers and other stakeholders want businesses to be more responsible in the way the product is produced such as to minimize waste production, the expectations have also changed to recovery of products after use in order to reduce cost and environmental impact of recycling. Businesses are becoming more responsible about collecting, reusing, refurbishing or dismantling used products to minimize environmental damage. Expected learning outcomes – The case is significant for teachers and students of “environment management”, corporate social responsibility, “supply chain” and “the importance of networks”. It can be used to understand how reverse logistics helps to minimize waste. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
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7Road to Kamaka: the struggles of poverty and desertification
Author(s):Joseph Khoury, Luciano Barin-Cruz
Title – Road to Kamaka: the struggles of poverty and desertification. Subject area – Sustainable development (in under-developed rural communities). Study level/applicability – Bachelor's degree. Case overview – The case follows six young adults from Quebec, who are mandated with a three-month agro-environmental project in the fight against desertification and poverty, in Kamaka, a village in the Sahel region of Mali. The project's central element is the development of a community garden that would ensure the diversification of the community's nutritional diet, and the rehabilitation of the environment. The mandate also consists of various environmental awareness workshops pertaining to efficient energy consumption, composting, and solar food drying techniques. The project, in its fourth year of collaboration between the Quebec organization and their local Malian partner, does not seem to have been yielding the desired results. The team is faced with the challenges of understanding the opportunities and limitations of the project so that they can try to succeed where previous teams have failed; while overcoming the organizational and logistical shortfalls that they faced prior to the start of their work, as they simultaneously struggled to adapt to their totally new context. Expected learning outcomes – How to prepare for, approach, and carry out local community development projects – environmental and/or social – in under-developed regions such as Mali. Mainly, how to create a shared vision with the concerned community; build an effective multi-stakeholder network; and ultimately co-create sustainable value (as per the proposed Senge model). Supplementary materials – Teaching notes and short documentary online link. Close
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8SELCO: lighting rural India
Author(s):Rakesh Kumar Pati, Niharika Garud
Title – SELCO: lighting rural India. Subject area – Social entrepreneurship, Sustainability and Human Resource. Study level/applicability – The case study is relevant for students of entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship. This case can be used as a case in strategy (growth strategy), marketing and innovation subjects as well. Case overview – The case study revolves around Mr Harish Hande and his efforts to build a for-profit social enterprise Solar Electric Light Company (SELCO) to provide electricity to poor and under-served. Harish focused on providing cheap, clean and sustainable energy sources to rural customers at bottom of the pyramid of the society. From the conception of SELCO, Harish has been on a roller-coaster ride of success and failure. Harish has used the problems as a learning ground and improved his business model successfully. But, when Harish tried to scale his operations in 2005-2006 he failed miserably. Some errors in the decision coupled with external pressure had brought SELCO to a verge of collapse. Owing to the determination of Harish and his team, SELCO was able to revive from the difficult times to generate profits again. Harish now again wants to expand but this time he would not take any chances. He wants to analyze and discuss every possible issue, he might face during his expansion plans. Expected learning outcomes – The key learning aspects of this case is to understand importance and practice of talent management. The case also highlights the best practices that SELCO uses to reach its clients and provide them complete solution. Supplementary materials – Teaching note. Close
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9Affordable solar solutions to replace diesel gensets
Author(s):Harjit Singh
Title – Affordable solar solutions to replace diesel gensets. Subject area – Strategic management, sustainable development, business economics, construction management, energy management. Study level/applicability – Undergraduate and Master's level business and management programmes with a focus on environmental or strategic management. Case overview – Fewer than two percent of Guinea Bissau's rural households had access to electricity from the grid. Efforts by the state monopoly to improve that figure by expanding the grid have had little effect, in part because the rural population was sparse. Central Electronics Limited, a public sector based company in India, was assigned to develop economic solar systems as a safe and eco-friendly substitute for the diesel gensets under IBSA (a trilateral, developmental initiative among India, Brazil, and South Africa) with the help of United Nations Development Program. The case provides an opportunity to examine the strategy of a small and poor nation to meet the needs of modern energy sources needed for improvement in health, education, transportation, and commercial development. The case focuses on Guinea Bissau's use of a trilateral partnership to achieve its rural electrification objectives despite several push backs. Expected learning outcomes – Students will demonstrate ability to analyse, comprehend, and evaluate the essence of solar energy as an alternate for costly grid energy in the initial stage of development. It will also provide students to converse with the specific advantages of solar systems over conventional power generating systems and construct a novel solution that serves the needs of various stakeholders at the bottom of the income pyramid. Supplementary materials – Teaching note. Close
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10Homegrown Kenya: the horticultural industry under fire on CSR
Author(s):George O. K'Aol, Francis Wambalaba
Title – Homegrown Kenya: the horticultural industry under fire on CSR. Subject area – Corporate social responsibility (CSR). Study level/applicability – The Homegrown case is designed for teaching corporate social responsibility and business ethics at undergraduate and graduate levels. The case may be used on a variety of courses including: corporate social responsibility, business ethics and corporate social responsibility, and business ethics. Case overview – In May 2003, the headline of the East African newspaper screamed “The Kenyan Horticultural Industry under fire.” The industry was accused of exploitative labor policies with respect to working conditions, workers' welfare, sexual harassment, and exposure to harmful pesticides by the key stakeholders led by the Kenya Human Rights Commission. The stakeholders had announced plans to conduct national and international campaigns against the flower growing and exporting companies in Kenya. Mr Richard Fox, the Managing Director of Homegrown was worried that the publicity had adversely tarnished the image and reputation of the horticultural industry in Kenya as a whole, including Homegrown. He wondered how best to respond to these allegations. Should Homegrown wait to see what the competitors and other stakeholders would do, as these were industry-wide problems or should Homegrown take the lead? And if so, what should be the scope of the programs, given the diverse nature of the issues? He had to make decision quickly. Expected learning outcomes – The case provides opportunity for students to analyze, discuss, and debate topical issues in CSR. At the end of the case, students should be able to: identify emerging CSR and ethical issues facing the horticultural industry in Kenya; analyze the cost of implementing CSR programs in business organizations; evaluate the impact of CSR programs on business performance; justify and defend choices on CSR, and ethical decisions. Supplementary materials – Not included. Close
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