Search
  Advanced Search
 

Browse Case Studies

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies


Show: All content | Just my subscriptions

Tourism and Hospitality

Content
Content Id: Content Information:
0Resort-based or resource-based tourism? A case study of Jamaica
Author(s):Gaunette Marie Sinclair-Maragh
Title – Resort-based or resource-based tourism? A case study of Jamaica. Subject area – This case study can be used in the following subject areas: tourism management; tourism policy; tourism planning and development; destination marketing and management; hospitality and tourism management; special event planning and management; and attraction management. Study Read more
Title – Resort-based or resource-based tourism? A case study of Jamaica. Subject area – This case study can be used in the following subject areas: tourism management; tourism policy; tourism planning and development; destination marketing and management; hospitality and tourism management; special event planning and management; and attraction management. Study level/applicability – This case study is useful to both undergraduate and graduate students specializing in hospitality and tourism management. Case overview – This case study explored the nature of two forms of tourism development; resort-based and resource-based, and aimed to determine which is the more viable and sustainable option for the future of tourism in Jamaica, an island destination in the Caribbean which depends highly on the tourism industry. The literature established that both forms of tourism are challenged by several and varying factors and so their synergistic integration appears to be the most functional option for sustainable tourism development in Jamaica along with the involvement of the relevant stakeholders. Expected learning outcomes – The students should be able to: Distinguish between resort-based tourism and resource-based tourism by identifying the elements and attributes that make them different. ?Explain the usefulness and drawbacks of both types of tourism model. ?Discuss the nature of culture and heritage tourism and eco-tourism. ?Analyze Jamaica's tourism model from the nineteenth to the twenty-firstst century by assessing the changes and developments. ?Discuss the role of government in facilitating the development of a “wholisitic tourism model” that will facilitate the synergy of resort-based tourism and resource-based tourism. ?Assess the role of the private sector in encouraging and facilitating resource-based tourism. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Social implications – This case study conceptually and empirically analyzed the tourism model in Jamaica to ascertain whether or not the future of Jamaica's tourism should remain dependent on resort-based tourism or should it opt for resource-based tourism as a more viable and sustainable option. The discussion however, indicates that resort-based tourism can synergize with resource-based tourism to achieve sustainable development along with the involvement of all the relevant stakeholders including the government, hotel operators and the residents. The case synopsis likewise presented a concise summary of the literature reviewed regarding the concepts of resort-based tourism and resource-based tourism; and the case of Jamaica's tourism.The learning outcomes are intended to guide the teaching- learning process and stimulate students' understanding of the concepts of resort-based tourism and resource-based tourism and their specific implications in terms of tourism development in Jamaica. This knowledge can also be generalized to other destinations with similar historical background and tourism resources. The applied questions will guide the discussions and provide additional resources for assessment purposes. They will also help the students to critically assess the dynamics of tourism development.The case synopsis is consistent with the learning outcomes, corresponding applied questions and course recommendations. A total of two to three-hours teaching session can be used to discuss the constructs, analyze the case in point and answer the applied questions. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (82kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
1Sun International: can a blue ocean strategy change the future fortunes of this South African leisure group?
Author(s):Shaun Vorster, Marius Ungerer
Title – Sun International: can a blue ocean strategy change the future fortunes of this South African leisure group? Subject area – Tourism & Hospitality Study level/applicability – Post graduate Case overview – The South African-based Sun International Group (SI) develops, operates and manages hotels, resorts and casinos. In its Read more
Title – Sun International: can a blue ocean strategy change the future fortunes of this South African leisure group? Subject area – Tourism & Hospitality Study level/applicability – Post graduate Case overview – The South African-based Sun International Group (SI) develops, operates and manages hotels, resorts and casinos. In its mission statement, SI describes itself as a “leisure group offering superior gaming, hotel and entertainment experiences”. In 1984, SI was listed in the travel and leisure sector on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. SI is looking for growth opportunities. Expected learning outcomes – Strategic options analysis to create new market spaces. Practical application of blue ocean thinking frameworks. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (603kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
2Denbigh Showground: a potential “agri-cultural” attraction concept for tourism in Jamaica
Author(s):Gaunette Sinclair-Maragh
Title – Denbigh Showground: a potential “agri-cultural” attraction concept for tourism in Jamaica. Subject area – The proposed areas of study for this case are strategic management, marketing, tourism planning and development, hospitality management, attraction management and special event planning and management. Study level/applicability – The case is suitable for Read more
Title – Denbigh Showground: a potential “agri-cultural” attraction concept for tourism in Jamaica. Subject area – The proposed areas of study for this case are strategic management, marketing, tourism planning and development, hospitality management, attraction management and special event planning and management. Study level/applicability – The case is suitable for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing courses in the areas of strategic management, marketing, tourism planning and development, hospitality and tourism management, attraction management and special event planning and management. Case overview – The Denbigh Showground located in the parish of Clarendon, Jamaica, is the venue of the annual Agricultural and Industrial Show. Three separate studies conducted indicated the need for its development to enable the use of the facility all year round and to contribute to the socio-economic development of the parish. Suggested development options from these studies included a fun and amusement park, a site for eco-tourism and a multi-purpose agri-cultural facility with linkages to the parish's cultural legacies and places of interest. The large land acreage could facilitate its development, making the property a leading “agri-cultural” attraction concept. Expected learning outcomes – The students should be able to: identify the typology of the Denbigh Showground as an attraction; categorize the product offerings of the Denbigh Showground from a marketing perspective; explain the factors to consider regarding the development of the showground; analyze the socio-economic contributions of the facility to the parish of Clarendon and the community's attitude towards the development of the showground; discuss the potential uses of the Denbigh Showground that can make it a leading international “agri-cultural” attraction; synthesize the concept of sustainable tourism development and its importance to the development and viability of the attraction for future generations; and assess other tourism concepts such as community-based tourism, special interest tourism and alternative tourism and how they relate to the development of the Denbigh Showground. Social implications – This case study will help students understand the concept of an agri-cultural attraction and its impact on the socio-economic development of the surrounding communities and the country as a whole. The case will contribute to the existing body of knowledge in the areas of community development and residents' perception regarding tourism development. It offers insights to both potential and current investors; provides practical guidance to the government and other tourism planners to enable better planning for the areas' future growth and development; and serves as a reference for academicians as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or e-mail: support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (251kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
3“They don't just cater, they care” – a case on Sakthi's Kitchen Pvt Ltd
Author(s):Varsha Manikandan, G. Swaminathan, Varsha Khattri
Title – “They don't just cater, they care” – a case on Sakthi's Kitchen Pvt Ltd. Subject area – The given case deals with the fact that primary objectives of services producers and marketers are identical to those of all marketers: to develop and provide offerings that satisfy consumer needs Read more
Title – “They don't just cater, they care” – a case on Sakthi's Kitchen Pvt Ltd. Subject area – The given case deals with the fact that primary objectives of services producers and marketers are identical to those of all marketers: to develop and provide offerings that satisfy consumer needs and expectations, thereby ensuring their own economic survival. To achieve these objectives, service providers need to understand how consumers choose, experience, and evaluate their service offerings. It also talks about employing innovative techniques at the basic level by optimizing available resources offering quality service at value based pricing, thereby, increasing customer retention by developing the trust of the consumer. Study level/applicability – Graduation or post graduation level students studying subjects pertaining to the services aspect of marketing, namely innovative service offerings, value for money, service experience and evaluation, challenge of integrating the 4 A's of services marketing and offering them in sustainable quality, promotional or communication mix for services and consumer behaviour. Case overview – Today's dual-career couples, single-parent families, and two-job families are realizing a burning consumer need: more time. Individuals in these and other non-traditional family configurations are overstressed with their work and home obligations and find that dealing with many of life's everyday tasks is overwhelming. For many customers, all types of shopping have become “drudgery or worse.” The antidote to this time deficiency is found in many new services that recover time for consumers. One such professional service is catering. The present case study deals with grass root level innovations in this service offering that adds flavour to our lives. Expected learning outcomes – Understanding the catering services offering and its features in evolving consumer's world; analyzing the importance of optimizing available resources and offering customer satisfaction, ensuring marketers own economic survival; realizing the significance of value offering and related value based pricing for services; comprehending the importance of word of mouth in post experience evaluation in services; the effect of quality and quantity consciousness in marketers while offering catering services; and understanding obstacles and challenges faced by small and medium service industries at the initial level. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (254kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
4Marketing of the dark: “Memento Park” in Budapest
Author(s):Brent McKenzie
Title – Marketing of the dark: “Memento Park” in Budapest. Subject area – Marketing strategy; services marketing; tourism. Study level/applicability – Upper year undergraduate business/management, MBA, marketing/international business. Case overview – Memento Park is a large open air museum on the outskirts of Budapest, that houses statues, and related ephemera Read more
Title – Marketing of the dark: “Memento Park” in Budapest. Subject area – Marketing strategy; services marketing; tourism. Study level/applicability – Upper year undergraduate business/management, MBA, marketing/international business. Case overview – Memento Park is a large open air museum on the outskirts of Budapest, that houses statues, and related ephemera related to the communist period in Hungary. The park opened in 1993, four years after Hungary had shaken off its yolk of communism as part of the Iron Curtain, in 1989. This case presents a classic example of a business enterprise that sprang from a concept and access to inexpensive materials directly resulting form a changing external environment. The case presents the issues involved in making Memento Park a sustainable part of the Budapest tourist experience. Expected learning outcomes – This case challenges students to decide how best to determine a sustainable advantage. Arguably the value proposition that is being offered by Memento Park has a number of identifiable benefits to the target consumer. It is not replicable (at least in Hungary), has a truly unique content, and does not have large fixed or variable costs in terms of operations. The question is how to best develop a plan of attack for such a firm? Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (694kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions

Archive

Page: 1 | 2 | Next >
Archived content
Content Id: Content Information:
1Sun International: can a blue ocean strategy change the future fortunes of this South African leisure group?
Author(s):Shaun Vorster, Marius Ungerer
Title – Sun International: can a blue ocean strategy change the future fortunes of this South African leisure group? Subject area – Tourism & Hospitality Study level/applicability – Post graduate Case overview – The South African-based Sun International Group (SI) develops, operates and manages hotels, resorts and casinos. In its mission statement, SI describes itself as a “leisure group offering superior gaming, hotel and entertainment experiences”. In 1984, SI was listed in the travel and leisure sector on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. SI is looking for growth opportunities. Expected learning outcomes – Strategic options analysis to create new market spaces. Practical application of blue ocean thinking frameworks. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (603kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
2Denbigh Showground: a potential “agri-cultural” attraction concept for tourism in Jamaica
Author(s):Gaunette Sinclair-Maragh
Title – Denbigh Showground: a potential “agri-cultural” attraction concept for tourism in Jamaica. Subject area – The proposed areas of study for this case are strategic management, marketing, tourism planning and development, hospitality management, attraction management and special event planning and management. Study level/applicability – The case is suitable for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing courses in the areas of strategic management, marketing, tourism planning and development, hospitality and tourism management, attraction management and special event planning and management. Case overview – The Denbigh Showground located in the parish of Clarendon, Jamaica, is the venue of the annual Agricultural and Industrial Show. Three separate studies conducted indicated the need for its development to enable the use of the facility all year round and to contribute to the socio-economic development of the parish. Suggested development options from these studies included a fun and amusement park, a site for eco-tourism and a multi-purpose agri-cultural facility with linkages to the parish's cultural legacies and places of interest. The large land acreage could facilitate its development, making the property a leading “agri-cultural” attraction concept. Expected learning outcomes – The students should be able to: identify the typology of the Denbigh Showground as an attraction; categorize the product offerings of the Denbigh Showground from a marketing perspective; explain the factors to consider regarding the development of the showground; analyze the socio-economic contributions of the facility to the parish of Clarendon and the community's attitude towards the development of the showground; discuss the potential uses of the Denbigh Showground that can make it a leading international “agri-cultural” attraction; synthesize the concept of sustainable tourism development and its importance to the development and viability of the attraction for future generations; and assess other tourism concepts such as community-based tourism, special interest tourism and alternative tourism and how they relate to the development of the Denbigh Showground. Social implications – This case study will help students understand the concept of an agri-cultural attraction and its impact on the socio-economic development of the surrounding communities and the country as a whole. The case will contribute to the existing body of knowledge in the areas of community development and residents' perception regarding tourism development. It offers insights to both potential and current investors; provides practical guidance to the government and other tourism planners to enable better planning for the areas' future growth and development; and serves as a reference for academicians as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or e-mail: support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (251kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
3“They don't just cater, they care” – a case on Sakthi's Kitchen Pvt Ltd
Author(s):Varsha Manikandan, G. Swaminathan, Varsha Khattri
Title – “They don't just cater, they care” – a case on Sakthi's Kitchen Pvt Ltd. Subject area – The given case deals with the fact that primary objectives of services producers and marketers are identical to those of all marketers: to develop and provide offerings that satisfy consumer needs and expectations, thereby ensuring their own economic survival. To achieve these objectives, service providers need to understand how consumers choose, experience, and evaluate their service offerings. It also talks about employing innovative techniques at the basic level by optimizing available resources offering quality service at value based pricing, thereby, increasing customer retention by developing the trust of the consumer. Study level/applicability – Graduation or post graduation level students studying subjects pertaining to the services aspect of marketing, namely innovative service offerings, value for money, service experience and evaluation, challenge of integrating the 4 A's of services marketing and offering them in sustainable quality, promotional or communication mix for services and consumer behaviour. Case overview – Today's dual-career couples, single-parent families, and two-job families are realizing a burning consumer need: more time. Individuals in these and other non-traditional family configurations are overstressed with their work and home obligations and find that dealing with many of life's everyday tasks is overwhelming. For many customers, all types of shopping have become “drudgery or worse.” The antidote to this time deficiency is found in many new services that recover time for consumers. One such professional service is catering. The present case study deals with grass root level innovations in this service offering that adds flavour to our lives. Expected learning outcomes – Understanding the catering services offering and its features in evolving consumer's world; analyzing the importance of optimizing available resources and offering customer satisfaction, ensuring marketers own economic survival; realizing the significance of value offering and related value based pricing for services; comprehending the importance of word of mouth in post experience evaluation in services; the effect of quality and quantity consciousness in marketers while offering catering services; and understanding obstacles and challenges faced by small and medium service industries at the initial level. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (254kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
4Marketing of the dark: “Memento Park” in Budapest
Author(s):Brent McKenzie
Title – Marketing of the dark: “Memento Park” in Budapest. Subject area – Marketing strategy; services marketing; tourism. Study level/applicability – Upper year undergraduate business/management, MBA, marketing/international business. Case overview – Memento Park is a large open air museum on the outskirts of Budapest, that houses statues, and related ephemera related to the communist period in Hungary. The park opened in 1993, four years after Hungary had shaken off its yolk of communism as part of the Iron Curtain, in 1989. This case presents a classic example of a business enterprise that sprang from a concept and access to inexpensive materials directly resulting form a changing external environment. The case presents the issues involved in making Memento Park a sustainable part of the Budapest tourist experience. Expected learning outcomes – This case challenges students to decide how best to determine a sustainable advantage. Arguably the value proposition that is being offered by Memento Park has a number of identifiable benefits to the target consumer. It is not replicable (at least in Hungary), has a truly unique content, and does not have large fixed or variable costs in terms of operations. The question is how to best develop a plan of attack for such a firm? Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (694kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
5Etihad Airways: reputation management – an example of the Eyjafjallajökull Iceland volcano
Author(s):Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan
Title – Etihad Airways: reputation management – an example of the Eyjafjallajökull Iceland volcano. Subject area – Crisis management, reputation and brand management, corporate communication, logistics, organization strategy. Study level/applicability – Post-graduate and executive education. Case overview – The Eyjafjallajökull Iceland Volcano erupted on April 14, 2010, causing an estimated loss of US$1.7 billion for the aviation industry. At one stage in this weeklong event, 1.2 million passengers were affected with 100,000 flights being grounded across Europe. This case documents the way Etihad, a leading global airline company managed the crisis and continues to learn for future scenarios. Expected learning outcomes – Adaptation strategies, reputation management, brand management, crisis planning and implementation, communication and stakeholder management, scenario analysis. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (373kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
6Jumeirah Group: STAY DIFFERENT™
Author(s):Melodena Stephens Balakrishnan
Title – Jumeirah Group: STAY DIFFERENT™ Subject area – Brand strategy, marketing strategy, service marketing, hospitality management and international marketing strategy. Study level/applicability – Post-graduate-level students; practitioners from the hospitality sector, brand management, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the arts and culture field may also benefit from the case. Case overview – Jumeirah Group is a luxury hospitality company that is implementing a global brand strategy after developing a strong-regional reputation. Jumeirah's strong cultural alignment to its Dubai heritage in the form of its hallmarks and communication tag line “Stay Different” is being translated into events, activities, sponsorship and more importantly in terms of service to create a symbolic and experiential brand strategy. For Alice Royton, the Director of Branding for Jumeirah Group, the dilemma was how to maintain the thrust forwards as a top luxury brand and keep brand synergy especially as Jumeirah was increasing its portfolio and the competitive arena heats up in the international market place. Expected learning outcomes – Creation of stakeholder value, brand strategy looking at various brand levels, using arts and culture as part of CSR initiative; communication strategy, emotional touch points and moment of truth as part of interactive service strategy; CRM and loyalty. Supplementary materials – Teaching notes. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (293kb) ]
7The Oberoi resorts: luxury redefined
Author(s):Sonia Bharwani
Title – The Oberoi resorts: luxury redefined Subject area – Tourism and hospitality. Study level/applicability – This case has been developed to suit the pedagogical needs of undergraduate and post-graduate students of management in the area of strategic marketing management in the service industry. Case overview – The case describes the challenge faced by Gautam Raj, Executive Vice President, Strategic Development, The Oberoi Group, in making submissions to the Chairman, P.R.S. Oberoi for giving shape to the company's future strategic plans and developing the blueprint for further growth. The Oberoi Group is a leading India-based hospitality company, which was looking at selective expansion in the five-star deluxe segments by seeking new opportunities for its luxury leisure business in order to achieve a greater geographic spread. The case gives detailed information related to “The Oberoi” resorts ranging from their genesis to their branding and marketing strategies to put into perspective the challenge faced by the protagonist in making appropriate recommendations regarding the optimal choice of location for new-luxury leisure resorts. Expected learning outcomes – The case is designed to give students an opportunity to demonstrate understanding of generic strategies for sustaining competitive advantage and market selection strategies and to analyse prospective location choices for making recommendations regarding appropriate markets to enter. Supplementary materials – Teaching note. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (224kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
8Scandic Hotel Chain in the Baltic – a case of strategic marketing
Author(s):Aihie Osarenkhoe, Az-Eddine Bennani
Subject area – Strategic marketing/marketing management. Study level/applicability – Undergraduate and post graduate courses in the principles of marketing, strategic marketing, strategic management, services marketing and hospitability management. Case overview – This case focuses on the critical success factors of “Scandic” hotel chain by highlighting its road to becoming the leading hotel chain in the Baltic region. This case covers a wide range of situations in which strategic marketing decisions were made, for example, the Scandic Sustainability Fund, supporting initiatives to promote sustainable social development. Special attention is devoted to how the case company's business philosophy is implemented to identify and differentiate its customers, in order to sustain a customer centric strategy and develop long lasting relationships. Expected learning outcomes – Following analysis of the case students should be able to: first, understand how marketing strategies can be utilized to effectively differentiate organizations from their competitors by capitalising on distinctive strengths, leading to the delivery of better value to stakeholders; second, understand how marketing strategy deals with the interplay of “the strategic three Cs” (customer, competition and corporation) in better satisfying customer needs; third, appreciate how companies operate within a given environment and the benefits of developing an environmental strategy. Supplementary materials – Teaching note including lecture plan. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (340kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
9Ginger – Smart Basics™
Author(s):Mukta Kamplikar
Subject area – Services management, strategy, marketing. Study level/applicability – Services management, strategy, marketing. Case overview – Owned and operated by the Tata Group, Ginger Hotels is the first-of-its-kind of Smart Basics™ hotels across India. The case explores the business model and the relevance of the service concept given the Indian context and consumer behaviour, the marketing strategy, and communication strategy of Ginger. Challenges such as the use of outsourcing, learning and development, and attrition are discussed. Expected learning outcomes – From a marketing perspective, this case can be used to demonstrate understanding of consumer behavior, reshaping customer expectations, perceived service quality, Gaps in service, service orientation, and value-for-money positioning, aggressive advertising and promotions, use of the marketing mix to introduce a new service concept in a market.From a management perspective, the case can be used to highlight how the marketing strategy is being delivered through a focus on service staff (selection, training, and motivation) and operations (logistics, IT, and communications), and branding (brand strategy – alignment to the corporate strategy).Third, the case is suitable for highlighting strategy – analyzing current competitive advantages, and carving out potential future competitive advantages in a services context. For example, strategic analysis models such as Porter's industry analysis and value-chain models can be applied to examine the sources and sustainability of Ginger's competitive advantages.The case can also be used for teaching service innovation. Supplementary materials – Teaching note. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (182kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions
10Air Jamaica … more than a national airline
Author(s):Gaunette Sinclair-Maragh
Subject area – Hospitality and tourism management; strategic management; marketing, transportation system management and human resource management. Study level/applicability – Undergraduate in business and management and hospitality and tourism management. Case overview – This teaching case outlines the historical background, successes and challenges of the national airline of Jamaica. It shows how a national airline, which is a heritage asset and one that has provided nostalgic and sentimental value to the Jamaican people and its passengers, had to be divested. The airline has been faced with several challenges; the major one being high-operating costs, especially in light of the global economic recession. The case also highlights the various procedures carried out by the Government of Jamaica before and after the divestment arrangement and also by the acquirer, Caribbean Airlines. Expected learning outcomes – The student should be able to: first, differentiate among the various strategic management terms and concepts used in the case; second, explain the importance of strategic decisions versus emotional decisions; third, assess the environmental factors that impacted Air Jamaica's operation; fourth, analyse the environmental factors that should have been considered by Caribbean Airlines before making the decision to acquire Air Jamaica; fifth, carry out a comparative analysis of the various corporate-level strategies to identify the best option for the Government of Jamaica; sixth, propose reasons why Caribbean Airlines acquired Air Jamaica. Supplementary materials – Teaching note. Close
Please login  |  Abstract & purchase  [ HTML & PDF (47kb) ]  |  Reprints & permissions