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Journal cover: Leadership & Organization Development Journal

Leadership & Organization Development Journal

ISSN: 0143-7739
Incorporates: Participation and Empowerment: An International Journal

Online from: 1980

Subject Area: Organization Studies

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Long hours at work: are they dangerous and do people consent to them?


Document Information:
Title:Long hours at work: are they dangerous and do people consent to them?
Author(s):Lawson K. Savery, (School of Management, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia), J. Alan Luks, (School of Management, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia)
Citation:Lawson K. Savery, J. Alan Luks, (2000) "Long hours at work: are they dangerous and do people consent to them?", Leadership & Organization Development Journal, Vol. 21 Iss: 6, pp.307 - 310
Keywords:Australia, Illness, Overtime, Stress, Working hours, Work-related injury
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/01437730010372831 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:MCB UP Ltd
Abstract:This study examines the influence of perceived work-related stress levels and levels of job satisfaction on work-related injury/illnesses. Further, the influence of demographic data on these variables is also considered. The data were collected in a Federal Government study on Workplace Industrial Activities across Australia (AWIRS 95). It appears, from the data, that there is a significant relationship between low levels of job satisfaction and the reporting of work-related injury/illnesses in the previous 12 months. This is also true for people who reported high levels of job stress. The data show that women seem to be more satisfied than their male colleagues and have fewer injuries and/or illnesses. One reason for the low level of injury/illness may be due to the occupations that men and women occupy. It seems that people who work in such occupations as labourers, plant and machine operators and tradespersons and apprentices are the most likely to have work-related accidents and/or illnesses than other occupations and many of the people in the high injury incident occupations appear to be males. The study draws tentative conclusions on the influence of demographic data on levels of job satisfaction and job stress and the relationships with work-related injury and/or illnesses.



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