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Journal cover: Women In Management Review

Women In Management Review

ISSN: 0964-9425
Currently published as: Gender in Management: An International Journal

Online from: 1985

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

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Gender, gender identity, and aspirations to top management


Document Information:
Title:Gender, gender identity, and aspirations to top management
Author(s):Gary N. Powell, (Gary N. Powell is Ackerman Scholar and Professor of Management at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.), D. Anthony Butterfield, (D. Anthony Butterfield is Professor of Management in the Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA.)
Citation:Gary N. Powell, D. Anthony Butterfield, (2003) "Gender, gender identity, and aspirations to top management", Women In Management Review, Vol. 18 Iss: 1/2, pp.88 - 96
Keywords:Career planning, Gender, Management, Top management
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/09649420310462361 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:MCB UP Ltd
Abstract:Data gathered by the authors from undergraduate and part-time graduate business students in 1976-1977 suggested that men were more likely than women to aspire to top management and that, consistent with traditional stereotypes of males and managers, a gender identity consisting of high masculinity and low femininity was associated with aspirations to top management. As a result of gender-related social changes, we expected the gender difference in aspirations to top management but not the importance of gender identity to have decreased over time. We collected data in 1999 from the same two populations to test these notions. In newly collected data, high masculinity (but not low femininity) was still associated with such aspirations, and men still aspired to top management positions more than women. However, the gender difference in aspirations to top management did not decrease over time.



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