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Journal cover: Journal of Health Organization and Management

Journal of Health Organization and Management

ISSN: 1477-7266
Previously published as: Journal of Management in Medicine

Online from: 2003

Subject Area: Health Care Management/Healthcare

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Emotional structure and commitment: implications for health care management


Document Information:
Title:Emotional structure and commitment: implications for health care management
Author(s):John Humphreys, (College of Business, Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico, USA), Bill Brunsen, (College of Business, Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico, USA), Dale Davis, (College of Business, Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico, USA)
Citation:John Humphreys, Bill Brunsen, Dale Davis, (2005) "Emotional structure and commitment: implications for health care management", Journal of Health Organization and Management, Vol. 19 Iss: 2, pp.120 - 129
Keywords:Health services, Job commitment, Medical management, Organizational behaviour, Psychology
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/14777260510600040 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – This paper aims to determine if the emotional structure of direct healthcare workers was related to their commitment to the organization.

Design/methodology/approach – A total of 105 direct healthcare workers completed self-report surveys to determine their emotional intelligence, emotional coping ability, and affective organizational commitment. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and independent sample t tests were used to analyze the data.

Findings – A significant correlation was found between emotional intelligence, emotional coping ability, and organizational commitment. In addition, emotional intellect served as a moderating variable between coping ability and commitment such that those direct care workers who exhibited higher emotional coping abilities were more committed when emotional intelligence was high rather than low.

Research limitations/implications – This was an exploratory study. Larger sample sizes across multiple healthcare settings should be examined before definitive inferences should be drawn. Future studies should likely introduce other variables such as satisfaction, effort, and even performance appraisals to delineate causal relationships.

Practical implications – It appears that personality constructs such as emotional intelligence and coping ability could possibly be used as predictive instruments to determine who might be most successful in operating in the highly emotionally charged environment of healthcare.

Originality/value – This is the first study that examined the constructs of emotional intellect and coping ability and organizational commitment using a direct healthcare worker sample. It provides support for the conjecture that interpersonal emotional dynamics are critical in emotionally charged environments. This knowledge could assist healthcare managers in addressing the shortage and attrition rates associated with many direct healthcare fields.



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