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Journal cover: International Journal of Public Sector Management

International Journal of Public Sector Management

ISSN: 0951-3558

Online from: 1988

Subject Area: Industry and Public Sector Management

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New public management in developing countries: An analysis of success and failure with particular reference to Singapore and Bangladesh


Document Information:
Title:New public management in developing countries: An analysis of success and failure with particular reference to Singapore and Bangladesh
Author(s):Abu Elias Sarker, (Department of Business and Public Administration, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates)
Citation:Abu Elias Sarker, (2006) "New public management in developing countries: An analysis of success and failure with particular reference to Singapore and Bangladesh", International Journal of Public Sector Management, Vol. 19 Iss: 2, pp.180 - 203
Keywords:Bangladesh, Developing countries, Public administration, Singapore
Article type:Case study
DOI:10.1108/09513550610650437 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyse the factors influencing the relative success and failure of new public management (NPM) initiatives in the developing world, with particular reference to Singapore and Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach – Secondary materials have been extensively used, interpreted and reinterpreted to substantiate the arguments. The analysis has been confined to two countries. However, the experiences of NPM initiatives of other countries have also been analysed to strengthen the arguments.

Findings – There are some critical factors such as the advanced level of economic development, the existence of a formal market economy, the rule of law, the advanced level of administrative infrastructure and state efficiency for the success of NPM-oriented reforms. To a large extent, Singapore fulfills these conditions. Bangladesh is lagging behind these conditions, and has achieved very little in NPM initiatives. The findings also indicate that there is still a greater role of the state in socio-economic transformation in general and implementation of market-oriented reforms in particular.

Practical implications – The Singapore case offers ample lessons for low-income developing countries such as Bangladesh who are struggling with their administrative reforms.

Originality/value – The value of the paper lies in clearly delineating the factors of success and failure and relating these to concrete cases on a comparative basis. More importantly, analyses of the Bangladesh case could be of immense value to state decision makers of Bangladesh and countries with similar socio-economic and political standings.



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