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Journal cover: Corporate Communications: An International Journal

Corporate Communications: An International Journal

ISSN: 1356-3289

Online from: 1996

Subject Area: Marketing

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Advertising corporate social responsibility: Results from an experimental manipulation of key message variables


Document Information:
Title:Advertising corporate social responsibility: Results from an experimental manipulation of key message variables
Author(s):Alan Pomering, (Centre for Research in Socially Responsible Marketing, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia), Lester W. Johnson, (Melbourne Business School, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia), Gary Noble, (School of Management and Marketing, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia)
Citation:Alan Pomering, Lester W. Johnson, Gary Noble, (2013) "Advertising corporate social responsibility: Results from an experimental manipulation of key message variables", Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Vol. 18 Iss: 2, pp.249 - 263
Keywords:Advertising, Australia, Corporate identity, Corporate image, Corporate social responsibility, Experimental design, Message variables
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/13563281311319517 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how social topic information (STI) and corporate social responsibility commitment (CSRC) substantiate the firm's CSR claims and promote message persuasion.

Design/methodology/approach – A 2×2 between-subjects experimental design was used to examine the impact of STI and CSRC on output variables using an online sample of 176 participants in Australia.

Findings – The study found that manipulation of STI had a statistically significant impact on outcome variables, but that CSRC did not.

Research limitations/implications – The study was limited to Australia and used a fictitious brand in the experiment.

Practical implications – For marketing communications and brand managers, this study informs CSR-based corporate image advertising.

Social implications – Support for more socially responsible businesses through responsible consumption can potentially transform product attributes and markets. More effective CSR communication is critical to this response.

Originality/value – To date, no research has examined how consumer persuasion of CSR advertising claims might be enhanced using message variables. This study has implications for theory and practice for the effective communication of pro-social achievements, and suggests further research areas.



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