Search
  Advanced Search
 
Journal search
Journal cover: Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy

ISSN: 1750-6166

Online from: 2007

Subject Area: Industry and Public Sector Management

Content: Latest Issue | icon: RSS Latest Issue RSS | Previous Issues

 

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

E-participation in local governments: An examination of political-managerial support and impacts


Document Information:
Title:E-participation in local governments: An examination of political-managerial support and impacts
Author(s):Christopher Reddick, (Department of Public Administration, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Donald F. Norris, (Department of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, USA)
Citation:Christopher Reddick, Donald F. Norris, (2013) "E-participation in local governments: An examination of political-managerial support and impacts", Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, Vol. 7 Iss: 4, pp.453 - 476
Keywords:E-democracy, E-government, E-participation
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/TG-02-2013-0008 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Acknowledgements:The authors wish to thank UMBC's Research Venture Fund and the College of Public Policy research grant at UTSA that enabled them to conduct the survey that produced the data on which this paper is based.
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to examine factors that explain top governmental officials' support for e-participation in American local governments, and to examine the impacts of e-participation adoption on local governments in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach – This study utilizes a national survey of e-participation among US local governments, which examines factors that predict greater political-managerial support for e-participation and factors associated with positive impacts from e-participation.

Findings – This research found that demand was the most important factor predicting political-managerial support for e-participation and impacts.

Research limitations/implications – This study produced somewhat limited results partly because relatively few of the responding governments had adopted any significant number of e-participation activities. A second limitation is that the authors took a quantitative approach to e-participation supports and impacts, which did not enable them to tease out some of the more subtle nuisances of e-participation adoption and its impact on government. A third limitation is that the authors conducted the research only on governments at the local level in one nation.

Practical implications – Local governments should ensure top level (elected and appointed officials) support for e-participation for it to be successful. Citizen demand, formal planning, and taking e-participation are seriously also associated with adoption and positive impacts. So, local governments should consider these factors when developing e-participation.

Originality/value – This study is first to examine the impacts of e-participation adoption on local governments in the USA.



Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?
- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (209kb)

Due to our platform migration, pay-per-view is temporarily unavailable.

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions