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Journal cover: Management Research News

Management Research News

ISSN: 0140-9174
Currently published as: Management Research Review

Online from: 1978

Subject Area: Management Science/Management Studies

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Factors in absenteeism and presenteeism: life events and health events


Document Information:
Title:Factors in absenteeism and presenteeism: life events and health events
Author(s):James N. MacGregor, (School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada), J. Barton Cunningham, (School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada), Natasha Caverley, (School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada)
Citation:James N. MacGregor, J. Barton Cunningham, Natasha Caverley, (2008) "Factors in absenteeism and presenteeism: life events and health events", Management Research News, Vol. 31 Iss: 8, pp.607 - 615
Keywords:Absenteeism, Employee behaviour, Personal health, Stress
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/01409170810892163 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of stressful life events and health related events with sickness absenteeism and presenteeism (attending work while ill or injured).

Design/methodology/approach – A web-based survey was conducted within a public service organization which had just undergone a significant downsizing, where the workforce was reduced by over 30 per cent.

Findings – The findings indicated that stressful life events were significantly associated with both presenteeism and absenteeism, to the same degree.

Research limitations/implications – These results extend previous research in suggesting that employees are substituting presenteeism for absenteeism. However, different health risks (chronic conditions vs needing counselling support) were more likely to predict absenteeism than presenteeism.

Originality/value – By supporting a substitution hypothesis, the present study suggests that both presenteeism and absenteeism are important measures of employee health and organizational productivity.



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