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Journal cover: Personnel Review

Personnel Review

ISSN: 0048-3486

Online from: 1971

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

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Knowledge workers, managers, and contingent employment relationships


Document Information:
Title:Knowledge workers, managers, and contingent employment relationships
Author(s):Lindsay Redpath, (Centre for Innovative Management, Athabasca University, St Albert, Canada), Deborah Hurst, (Centre for Innovative Management, Athabasca University, St Albert, Canada), Kay Devine, (Centre for Innovative Management, Athabasca University, St Albert, Canada)
Citation:Lindsay Redpath, Deborah Hurst, Kay Devine, (2009) "Knowledge workers, managers, and contingent employment relationships", Personnel Review, Vol. 38 Iss: 1, pp.74 - 89
Keywords:Canada, Careers, Contingent workers, Human resource management, Knowledge management, Psychological contracts
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/00483480910920723 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to compare knowledge employees' perceptions of contingent work with their managers' perceptions, highlighting potential differences in their respective psychological contracts which might produce dissonance in the employment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach – Original research using interviews and scalar data of both contingent knowledge workers and their managers are reported. The study sample consists of 32 contingent knowledge workers and 33 managers in five industries in Canada: two public sector and three private sector.

Findings – The results of this study indicate that differences exist between contingent knowledge workers and their managers with how contingent work affects career goals, promotion opportunities, and training and development opportunities. Additionally, differences occur in the constructs that mirror the traditional empirical measurements of the psychological contract. Two major themes are revealed: coping with uncertainty and integration with the organization on the part of contingent workers and managers.

Originality/value – This study contributes to research on contingent employment as it compares manager and contingent knowledge worker responses in terms of the psychological contracts formed by each.



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