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Journal cover: The British Journal of Forensic Practice

The British Journal of Forensic Practice

ISSN: 1463-6646
Currently published as: Journal of Forensic Practice

Online from: 1999

Subject Area: Health and Social Care

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Searching for ‘What Works’: HM Prison Service accredited cognitive skills programmes


Document Information:
Title:Searching for ‘What Works’: HM Prison Service accredited cognitive skills programmes
Author(s):Louise Falshaw, (Research, Development & Statistics Directorate, Home Office, Offending and Criminal Justice Group, UK), Caroline Friendship, (Research, Development & Statistics Directorate, Home Office, Offending and Criminal Justice Group, UK), Rosie Travers, (HM Prison Service, UK), Francis Nugent, (HM Prison Service, UK)
Citation:Louise Falshaw, Caroline Friendship, Rosie Travers, Francis Nugent, (2004) "Searching for ‘What Works’: HM Prison Service accredited cognitive skills programmes", The British Journal of Forensic Practice, Vol. 6 Iss: 2, pp.3 - 13
Article type:General review
DOI:10.1108/14636646200400007 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:This study evaluated the effectiveness of prison-based cognitive skills programmes in England and Wales in reducing reconviction. Two-year reconviction rates were compared for adult male offenders who had participated in a cognitive skills programme between 1996 and 1998 (N = 649) and matched adult male offenders who had not participated (N = 1,947). There were no significant differences in the rates of reconviction between the treatment and matched comparisons. This contrasts with a previous study of prison-based cognitive skills programmes. Possible explanations for the current finding are discussed. For example, these results may merely reflect expected variation; international experience mirrors the variable reductions in reconviction rates found so far in the evaluation of prison-based programmes. This evaluation relates to a period when programmes were expanded rapidly, and this may have affected the quality of programme delivery.



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