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Journal cover: Tizard Learning Disability Review

Tizard Learning Disability Review

ISSN: 1359-5474

Online from: 1996

Subject Area: Health and Social Care

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The development of a sex offender assessment and treatment service within a community learning disability team (the SHEALD project): part 2


Document Information:
Title:The development of a sex offender assessment and treatment service within a community learning disability team (the SHEALD project): part 2
Author(s):Angela Olsen, (Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Salford, Salford, UK), Michael Ravey, (Senior Lecturer in Nursing at the University of Salford, Salford, UK)
Citation:Angela Olsen, Michael Ravey, (2011) "The development of a sex offender assessment and treatment service within a community learning disability team (the SHEALD project): part 2", Tizard Learning Disability Review, Vol. 16 Iss: 3, pp.17 - 20
Keywords:Community care, Disabled people, Intellectual disability, Sex offending, Treatment
Article type:Viewpoint
DOI:10.1108/13595471111158657 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – This paper aims to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue on “The development of a sex offender assessment and treatment service within a Community Learning Disability Team (the SHEALD project): part 2”.

Design/methodology/approach – The authors consider the nature of traditional service delivery for people with learning/intellectual disabilities and the potential that services have for the physical, emotional and sexual abuse of these vulnerable people.

Findings – The authors argue that effective community based treatment/support is best delivered in a way that acknowledges and employs the range of skills offered by practitioners from health and social care backgrounds.

Originality/value – Both SHEALD and HIST are examples of community treatment programmes which show that a person-centred approach supported by a dedicated and consistent team of practitioners may be an effective way of addressing complex, high-risk behaviours.



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