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Journal cover: Meditari Accountancy Research

Meditari Accountancy Research

ISSN: 2049-372X

Online from: 2000

Subject Area: Accounting and Finance

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Comparing levels of career indecision among selected honours degree students at the University of Pretoria


Document Information:
Title:Comparing levels of career indecision among selected honours degree students at the University of Pretoria
Author(s):Y. Jordaan, (Department of Marketing and Communication Management, University of Pretoria), C. Smithard, (Department of Marketing and Communication Management, University of Pretoria), E. Burger, (Department of Marketing and Communication Management, University of Pretoria)
Citation:Y. Jordaan, C. Smithard, E. Burger, (2009) "Comparing levels of career indecision among selected honours degree students at the University of Pretoria", Meditari Accountancy Research, Vol. 17 Iss: 2, pp.85 - 100
Keywords:Accounting, Career, Career indecision, Career uncertainty, Chartered accountant, Degree of study, Economics, Employment, Management, Marketing, Students, University of Pretoria
Article type:General review
DOI:10.1108/10222529200900013 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:Career indecision plays a major role in the way students perceive their future career prospects and how they approach these prospects. In addition, career indecision influences career-related thoughts and decisions, and plays a role in the way students formulate career goals. A convenience sample from honours students in Accounting Sciences, Financial Management, Economics and Marketing was drawn and their levels of career indecision were measured using self-administered questionnaires. The study demonstrates that differences exist between students whose employment status differs, and those who were studying for different degrees. Consequently, this study has vital implications for groups (such as career counsellors and educational institutions) involved in the career decision-making processes of university students.



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