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Journal cover: Journal of Management in Medicine

Journal of Management in Medicine

ISSN: 0268-9235
Currently published as: Journal of Health Organization and Management
Incorporates: Health Manpower Management

Online from: 1986

Subject Area: Health Care Management/Healthcare

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Evaluating self-managed integrated community teams


Document Information:
Title:Evaluating self-managed integrated community teams
Author(s):Keith Hurst, (Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK), Jackie Ford, (Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK), Cath Gleeson, (Independent Consultant Nurse in School Health, Huddersfield, UK)
Citation:Keith Hurst, Jackie Ford, Cath Gleeson, (2002) "Evaluating self-managed integrated community teams", Journal of Management in Medicine, Vol. 16 Iss: 6, pp.463 - 483
Keywords:Evaluation, Health care, Self-managing teams
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/02689230210450016 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:MCB UP Ltd
Abstract:After briefly describing self-managed integrated community teams, the authors explore potential and actual methods of evaluating their structures, processes and outcomes. Primary health care staff in three comparable sites were studied using non-participant observation, interviews, focus groups and questionnaires. After describing the fieldwork, the authors examine integrated team structures, which are characterised by a large number of barriers that integrated teams face. Processes surrounding different working practices are explored next. Ways of unifying health care professional practice in integrated teams are suggested using evidence from both the literature and fieldwork. Outcomes that emerged after one year of the new teams’ lives are discussed in detail. The difficulty in establishing acceptable outcomes, especially the validity and reliability of outcome measures, is considered. Throughout, the positive and negative aspects of integrated teams emerging from the fieldwork are compared and contrasted with issues in the literature. Finally, recommendations are made to help strengthen integrated teams in the UK.



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