Search
  Advanced Search
 
Journal search
Journal cover: Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management

ISSN: 1363-951X
Previously published as: Police Studies: Intnl Review of Police Development
Incorporates: American Journal of Police

Online from: 1997

Subject Area: Industry and Public Sector Management

Content: Latest Issue | icon: RSS Latest Issue RSS | Previous Issues

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Icon: .

Citizen perceptions of community policing: are attitudes toward police important?


Document Information:
Title:Citizen perceptions of community policing: are attitudes toward police important?
Author(s):Michael D. Reisig, (School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA), Andrew L. Giacomazzi, (Department of Political Science, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas, USA)
Citation:Michael D. Reisig, Andrew L. Giacomazzi, (1998) "Citizen perceptions of community policing: are attitudes toward police important?", Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, Vol. 21 Iss: 3, pp.547 - 561
Keywords:Attitude surveys, Police
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/13639519810228822 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:MCB UP Ltd
Abstract:This study assessed citizen attitudes toward police performance and their perceptions of policing strategy in a small, northwestern town. At the neighbourhood-level, significant differences in attitudes toward police performance (i.e. officer demeanour and citizen-police relations) were revealed; however, variations in perceptions of community policing initiatives (i.e. collaborative police-community partnerships) were not observed. At the individual-level, results showed that attitudes toward police performance were not significant determinants of citizen perceptions of community policing. This evidence suggested that citizens were receptive to the idea of co-production of order, and specifically of partnerships between residents and the police to address neighbourhood crime-related issues. As such, these findings call into question the long standing assumption that positive attitudes toward police are a necessary precursor to the establishment of meaningful, co-operative ties between citizens and the police.



Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?
- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (91kb)Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions