Search
  Advanced Search
 
Journal search
Journal cover: Gender in Management: An International Journal

Gender in Management: An International Journal

ISSN: 1754-2413
Previously published as: Women In Management Review

Online from: 2008

Subject Area: Human Resource Management

Content: Latest Issue | icon: RSS Latest Issue RSS | Previous Issues

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Icon: .

A review of male and female Australian indigenous entrepreneurs: Disadvantaged past – promising future?


Document Information:
Title:A review of male and female Australian indigenous entrepreneurs: Disadvantaged past – promising future?
Author(s):Glenice J. Wood, (Davidson and Wood Consultants, Mt Buninyong, Australia), Marilyn J. Davidson, (Davidson and Wood Consultants, Stockport, UK)
Citation:Glenice J. Wood, Marilyn J. Davidson, (2011) "A review of male and female Australian indigenous entrepreneurs: Disadvantaged past – promising future?", Gender in Management: An International Journal, Vol. 26 Iss: 4, pp.311 - 326
Keywords:Australia, Australian Aboriginals, Entrepreneurs, Men, Women
Article type:Conceptual paper
DOI:10.1108/17542411111144319 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – Research in indigenous small business entrepreneurship in Australia is sparse. This paper aims to provide a review of the available literature culminating in a comprehensive model of characteristics, motivations and potential barriers to entrepreneurial activity.

Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings – “Push” factors were predominant as motivators for setting up business ventures and were strongly linked to the desire to improve severe disadvantage through very poor economic situations and negative racial stereotyping, discrimination and prejudice as well as addressing the needs of their community. Potential barriers to business development included lack of formal education, prior work experience, language barriers, culture conflicts and problems attaining sufficient finance. Female indigenous entrepreneurs faced both gender and racial discrimination.

Practical implications – This paper concludes with some suggestions on future research and government and policy directions to encourage indigenous Australian entrepreneurship as a means of economic development for this population.

Originality/value – The paper presents a unique comprehensive review and model of both male and female Australian indigenous entrepreneurs.



Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?
- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (233kb)Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions