Search
  Advanced Search
 
Journal search
Journal cover: Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management

ISSN: 2042-6747

Online from: 2011

Subject Area: Operations and Logistics Management

Content: Latest Issue | icon: RSS Latest Issue RSS | Previous Issues

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

Building humanitarian supply chain relationships: lessons from leading practitioners


Document Information:
Title:Building humanitarian supply chain relationships: lessons from leading practitioners
Author(s):Ron McLachlin, (Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada), Paul D. Larson, (Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada)
Citation:Ron McLachlin, Paul D. Larson, (2011) "Building humanitarian supply chain relationships: lessons from leading practitioners", Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Vol. 1 Iss: 1, pp.32 - 49
Keywords:Channel relationships, Humanitarian logistics, Narratives, Supply chain management
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/20426741111122402 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to advance thought and practice on supply chain relationship building, in the context of humanitarian logistics, drawing on lessons from leading practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach – The presentations were treated like data, enabling grounded research concerning practitioners. The presentations were recorded, transcribed, vetted, and imported into qualitative software (NVivo8) to facilitate further analysis, which led to testable propositions.

Findings – Three themes emerged, centered around relationship benefits, challenges, and advice on relationship building. Advice from the practitioners led to 11 propositions.

Research limitations/implications – While the presentations were treated as interview data, there was no opportunity to probe statements made by the speakers. Also, speakers were the sole representatives for their organizations. Finally, the findings cannot be generalized beyond the types of situations and organizations represented at the conference.

Practical implications – The propositions represent advice from experienced humanitarian practitioners on building supply chain relationships.

Social implications – Supply chains are economic entities. They are also social entities. Humanitarian supply chains involve people working together to help other people in need.

Originality/value – There are few published articles on supply chain relationship building, and only several pieces on humanitarian partnerships or relationships. This paper contributes to the literature in a novel way, by drawing on expert speakers at a humanitarian conference.



Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?
- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (154kb)Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions