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Journal cover: Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues

ISSN: 1753-7983

Online from: 2008

Subject Area: Education

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Contemporary Cleopatras: the business ethics of female Egyptian managers


Document Information:
Title:Contemporary Cleopatras: the business ethics of female Egyptian managers
Author(s):Liesl Riddle, (School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA), Meghana Ayyagari, (School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA)
Citation:Liesl Riddle, Meghana Ayyagari, (2011) "Contemporary Cleopatras: the business ethics of female Egyptian managers", Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, Vol. 4 Iss: 3, pp.167 - 192
Keywords:Business environment, Egypt, Ethics, Gender, Managers
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/17537981111159957 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Acknowledgements:The authors would like to thank Timothy Fort, Tjai Nielsen, David Ralston, Jennifer Spencer, Robert Weiner, and seminar participants at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of International Business for their suggestions and comments.
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore gender differences in ethical attitudes along two dimensions: perceived ethical strategies for career advancement, or upward-influence ethics; and perceived ethical roles of business in society and the natural environment, or business social and environmental responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach – Employing a variance decomposition procedure, the paper identifies substantive differences in the ethical perceptions of Egyptian male and female managers.

Findings – Female managers find more covert upward-influence strategies – strategies that are less aboveboard and transparent – acceptable and eschew overt upward-influence tactics – strategies that are aboveboard and transparent. Female managers also envision a larger role for business in society, particularly in terms of social responsibilities than do male managers.

Research limitations/implications – The study is exploratory, employing a small sample in a single country.

Originality/value – The findings contribute to ongoing debates about the role that a person's gender plays in influencing his/her ethical perspective, examining the issue in a developing country context. This paper's contribution is also methodological, demonstrating how variance decomposition can be used to examine these issues.



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