Emerald | Development and Learning in Organizations | Table of Contents http://www.emeraldinsight.com/1477-7282.htm Table of contents from the most recently published issue of Development and Learning in Organizations Journal en-gb Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited editorial@emeraldinsight.com support@emeraldinsight.com 60 Emerald | Development and Learning in Organizations | Table of Contents http://www.emeraldinsight.com/common_assets/img/covers_journal/dlocover.gif http://www.emeraldinsight.com/1477-7282.htm 120 157 Workplace mentoring: an old idea with new meaning (part 2) http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107068&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-11-2013-0086 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – This article is written in two parts and is presented as research-based insight on the growth of formal workplace mentoring programs and the alignment of mentoring with workforce development strategy. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – The research is taken from a two-year study conducted in the Australian rail industry aimed at establishing a harmonized approach to the use of workplace mentoring. Using mixed-methods and an interpretive approach seven major rail organizations from Australia and New Zealand contributed to detailed case studies, on-line surveys and in-depth interviews. Responses were obtained from all levels and functional areas within the organizations. <B>Findings</B> – Research findings support the literature and show a growing interest in the use of formal workplace mentoring to deal with a wide range of organizational issues such as employee retention, engagement, absence and turnover. Importantly, mentoring was found to be highly valued in the area of knowledge transfer and especially across multi-generational groups. In parallel with other traditional industries, rail organizations in Australia are about to lose large volumes of highly qualified and long-serving Baby-Boomers. Therefore, workforce development strategies will need to facilitate the transfer of tacit knowledge to a new generation of rail employees who are eager to learn, but less conformable with formal training courses. Mentoring is becoming an effective option for delivering this change. <B>Research limitations/implications</B> – The findings are contextual and may not fit all settings, but they offer a comparative account of workplace mentoring in an industry facing perpetual change, economic challenges and an impending shortage of skills in key areas. <B>Practical implications</B> – These articles have practical implications for human resource practitioners and professionals involved in the implementation of workforce development projects. Mentoring is an old concept enjoying new fame, but the intrinsic nature of mentoring, such as the need for highly-trusted relationships and confidential meetings means that organizations should tread carefully as they can engage mentees at a deep psychological level. <B>Originality/value</B> – These articles will be of value to human resource professionals and managers, assisting them to think differently about workplace mentoring and consider how the characteristics of mentoring are interdependent with the broader goals of workforce development. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Tom William Short) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Intergenerational learning in organizations. An effective way to stimulate older employee learning and development http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107069&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-10-2013-0078 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – To illustrate the possibilities of implementing intergenerational learning as a strategy for promoting older worker learning and development. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – Review of literature. <B>Findings</B> – Intergenerational learning is theoretically a natural and effective way for organizations to maintain competitive advantage in an ageing society. <B>Research limitations/implications</B> – There needs to be empirical work that actually tests the theoretical propositions. <B>Originality/value</B> – While intergenerational learning is not a new concept, using it as a strategy for assuring older worker learning is a new application. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Donald Ropes) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Developing high performance sales managers: key practices for accelerating growth http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107070&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-07-2013-0037 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – Further explore the issue of sales management development and identify the practices most critical to sales managers' learning and development. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – To explore the development needs of sales leaders, we surveyed 206 newer sales managers from ten US-based manufacturing and service organizations. The sample was 79 percent male and 21 percent female, averaged 2.2 years of sales management experience, 10.3 years of sales experience and 37.1 years of age. <B>Findings</B> – Practices that sales managers considered to be important for their development are: clarifying roles, goals and performance expectations (81 percent); receiving effective performance appraisals and reviews (74 percent); exposure to challenging/difficult job assignments (71 percent); conducting formal career planning discussions (68 percent); receiving ongoing performance measurement, feedback and coaching (66 percent); being mentored by senior managers/sales people (60 percent); involvement with professional associations/affiliations (58 percent); and utilizing 360° feedback systems (57 percent). <B>Originality/value</B> – If organizations are serious about developing their sales managers, they would be well served to consider the development practices presented in this study. Developing sales managers want clearly defined performance expectations as well as feedback from a wide variety of multi-sources including coaching, mentoring, and 360° processes. In addition, formal appraisals and career planning discussions, as well as the opportunity to participate in professional associations are desired areas of development. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Clinton Oliver Longenecker, Charles B. Ragland, Michael L. Mallin) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 What employees do not like about L&amp;D opportunities: and six learning strategies to win them back http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107071&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-09-2013-0075 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – To highlight six commonly cited employee criticism of learning and development initiatives in organisations and recommend six innovative learning and development strategies that counter the common criticisms. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – The paper is based on a finding of an international survey of 517 white-collar employees with regards to learning and development in their organizations. <B>Findings</B> – Employees appear to have numerous complaints about the learning and development opportunities they experience at work. Often learning and development specialists may never know what these grievances are. There is a range of inexpensive and easy to implement alternate strategies that overcome the commonest complaints of employees as reflected in the survey. <B>Practical implications</B> – The paper offers a description of six practical learning and development strategies that organizations can adopt to help develop their employees. The paper also provides practical advice on getting management support for these new initiatives. Organizations could save time, money and effort on the learning and development activities. <B>Originality/value</B> – An important finding of a recently concluded international study of significant size is shared in the paper. The paper presents empirical evidence of an under-researched but important topic and also forwards several innovative suggestions to address the central concern of the paper's topic. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Paul James Davis) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Entrepreneurship in South Africa: looking beyond funding http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107072&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-08-2013-0052 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – In the past years, several initiatives were implemented in South Africa to encourage entrepreneurship. In this paper, we try to answer the question: what services South African entrepreneurs want? In order to do so, the services offered by Enablis, a Canadian NGO whose purpose is to encourage entrepreneurship in South Africa are analyzed. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – Using a qualitative case study approach, this paper presents the point of view of entrepreneurs in South Africa. <B>Findings</B> – Surprisingly, we found that entrepreneurs want first and foremost networking opportunities. Human capital, expressed through training and developing entrepreneurs' skills is another key issue. Finally, access to financing is only the third priority for South African entrepreneurs. <B>Originality/value</B> – This research allowed the identification of the needs of entrepreneurs and provides an insight into entrepreneurship in South Africa. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Sophie Brière, Maripier Tremblay, Alain Daou) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Leading the way to innovation: How team coaching helps http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107073&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-02-2014-0005 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. <B>Findings</B> – An ability to innovate holds the key to sustained growth for many companies. And in a rapidly-evolving business world characterized by ever more intense global competition, its importance becomes even greater. Innovation is a demanding process and obviously requires talent. Effective teamwork is a vital part of the equation too. Indeed, it can be reasonably argued that adopting a team-oriented focus offers the most ideal means of generating and bringing creative suggestions to fruition. Furthermore, the innovation bug can certainly be infectious. When one team makes a crucial breakthrough, others in the organization want to follow suit and emulate the success. But such competition is healthy and can subsequently make the entire firm better positioned to tackle future challenges. <B>Practical implications</B> – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. <B>Originality/value</B> – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com () Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Management styles and success: Why coaching is important http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107074&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-02-2014-0006 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. <B>Findings</B> – Leadership is unquestionably one of the most critical components in the success of any organization. The business annals provide ample testimony to this. Many instances can be found of high-profile characters whose influence has undoubtedly helped differentiate their company from the also-rans. Think Bill Gates, Steve Jobs or other such eminent leaders who are among the numerous examples. Anyone able to deliver the perfect formula for effective leadership would for sure soon become one wealthy individual. Alas, that day is not yet upon us. But it does not mean we have no insights into how leaders make their firms tick. Far from it. There is plenty to go on. An important contribution to success is the realization that no one-cap-fits-all approach to success exists. On the contrary, management practice comes in several different forms. It is knowing how to combine this range of available approaches that perhaps holds the key. <B>Practical implications</B> – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. <B>Originality/value</B> – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com () Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Informal learning in the workplace: The key role of managers http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107075&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-02-2014-0007 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. <B>Findings</B> – A manager's lot is a tough one at the best of times. There is constant pressure to meet business and client needs, often against a backdrop of constantly dwindling resources. Economic uncertainty has ensured that this balancing act has become even more precarious in recent years. Delivering more for much less is very much the order of the day. Certain areas are notoriously vulnerable when the budget axe is wielded. Training and development is a perfect example. However, this is clearly something of a false economy as few companies will be best positioned to move forward if talent is not properly nurtured. Such short-term thinking continues to prevail though. <B>Practical implications</B> – Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. <B>Originality/value</B> – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to digest format. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com () Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 The future of learning and development in The Netherlands: interview with Rino Schreuder http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107076&show=abstract http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/DLO-08-2013-0051 <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> – This article presents a summary of the interview with Rino Schreuder, managing director of the European Management Development (EMD) Centre, founder and chairman of the European Executive Development Network, Editor of the <IT>Dutch Management Development Journal</IT>, and Editorial Board member of the UK journals <IT>Development &amp; Learning in Organizations</IT> and <IT>Leadership &amp; Organization Development Journal</IT>. Schreuder has over 20 years of experience working for <IT>Fortune</IT> 500 and other firms in the area of management development and training. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> – The interview is conducted by three independent interviewers. <B>Findings</B> – In this interview, Rino Schreuder shares his perspective on the present situation and the future of the Dutch learning and development market. Drawing on a parallel between the properties of the Dutch culture and problems in the learning market, Schreuder highlights the importance of more integrated ways of working between learning providers. He also calls for rethinking the role of learning professionals and chief learning officers (CLOs) in organizations and the organizational practices that measure learning outcomes through return on investments (ROI). <B>Originality/value</B> – The paper presents valuable insights of a leading professional in the field of management development and training into the future of learning and development in The Netherlands. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Evgenia I. Lysova, Sabrine El Baroudi, Svetlana N. Khapova) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Leadership (5th ed.) http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107078&show=abstract Suggested reading Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 International Human Resource Development: Learning, Education and Training for Individuals and Organisations (3rd ed.) http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107079&show=abstract Suggested reading literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (John P. Wilson) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Editorial http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1477-7282&volume=28&issue=2&articleid=17107077&show=abstract Editorial literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Anne Gimson) Tue, 28 Jan 2014 00:00:00 +0000