Emerald | Multicultural Education & Technology Journal | Table of Contents http://www.emeraldinsight.com/1750-497X.htm Table of contents from the most recently published issue of Multicultural Education & Technology Journal Journal en-gb Thu, 01 Jan 1970 01:00:00 +0100 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited editorial@emeraldinsight.com support@emeraldinsight.com 60 Emerald | Multicultural Education & Technology Journal | Table of Contents http://www.emeraldinsight.com/common_assets/img/covers_journal/metjcover.gif http://www.emeraldinsight.com/1750-497X.htm 120 157 Between ideal and reality: A different view on online-learning interaction in a cross-national context http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1750-497X&volume=8&issue=1&articleid=17105437&show=abstract <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> - The purpose of this study is to examine similar and/or different perspectives on, and practices of online-learning interaction as projected by the participating educators who are from either Korea or the US. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> - In this study we analyzed how college instructors from two countries, Korea and the United States, consider the role of online-learning interaction in their students’ learning by interviewing nine instructors from both countries.We examined the educators’ responses using constructivism and Confucianism as the frame of reference. <B>Findings</B> - Our analysis showed that the US instructors tend to focus on learner-to-learner interaction whereas Korean instructors emphasized teacher-to-learner interaction. Korean instructors perceived a gap between ideal and reality in integrating interaction as a part of online activities in the course.<B>Originality/value</B> - This study focuses on a cross-national comparison of online-learning interaction between Korea and US. thus, it will provide practical ideas for global or multicultural user experiences on online learning courses. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Sungae Yoo, Hye Jeong Kim, So Young Kwon) Fri, 14 Feb 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Hole-in-the-Wall Learning Stations and academic performance among rural children in India http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1750-497X&volume=8&issue=1&articleid=17105431&show=abstract <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> - Earlier research on "Hole- in- the- Wall (HiWEL)" conclusively indicated groups of children pick up computer literacy on their own and are adept at performing basic functions such as cut, copy, paste, surf the internet to answer high-end questions. Research also indicates that children self-organize themselves to figure out things which they find difficult and thus learning is a continuous process for them. Studies have also indicated that HiWEL pedagogy is child centric and is at the discretion of the child. Children organize themselves and become self-regulated learners. However, so far no study has been undertaken to determine whether children accessing HiWEL learning stations can improve in Mathematics and English. The intent of the present study is to examine whether groups of children are able to pick-up Mathematics and English on their own using the learning station.<B>Design/methodology/approach</B> - In order to study the impact of HiWEL LS on Mathematics and English, we took two groups; experimental group and control group from 6 States. a) Experimental group – 31 children from each site (except for two sites, where experimental group consisted of 30 children) were randomly selected to be a part of the study. 16 children from class 6th and 15 children from class 7th were identified. For this study, the experimental group consisted of a total of 277 children from 9 locations. Mathematics and English tests were administered at two time points, pre and post within a gap of six months of installing the learning station. b) Control group – Children that formed the control group were selected from nearby villages with similar socioeconomic background as the experimental group. A total of 135 children (15 children per location) were selected for this study. This group did not have access to HiWEL LS or to any other computers. These children were also tested on the same two tests at two time points, pre and post within a gap of 6 months. <B>Findings</B> - Childing exposed and using HiWEL learning Stations pick up academic English and Mathematics on their own for grade 6th and 7th. These are government school going children. Qualitiatively, the teachers and parents feel that they too have seen the benefits in the academic achievement of these children.<B>Research limitations/implications</B> - The study was done for a 6 months period across 7 sites. This study should be replicated over across entire India and a bigger sample should be taken for results to be conclusive.<B>Practical implications</B> - The actual quantity of schooling that underprivilege children experience and the quality of teaching they receive are extremely insufficient. This seems to be true of both the educationally more advanced states as well as the educationally backward states. These findings suggest a new pedagogy for enabling children to improve their academic performance which in turn leads to improvement in school performance. Thus, for our current educational system, it is important to have alternatives.<B>Originality/value</B> - So far no study has been undertaken to determine whether children accessing HiWEL learning stations can improve in Mathematics and English. The intent of the present study is to examine whether groups of children are able to pick-up Mathematics and English on their own using the learning station. And, the findings have been positive. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Ritu Dangwal, Krati Sharma, Santonu Hazarika) Fri, 14 Feb 2014 00:00:00 +0000 Technological Innovation in 21st Century Multicultural Teacher Preparation http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=1750-497X&volume=8&issue=1&articleid=17105409&show=abstract <strong>Abstract</strong><br /><br /><B>Purpose</B> - An increasingly diverse student population coupled with rapid technological change makes it paramount to examine how technology is being employed in multicultural teacher preparation (MTP) to prepare U.S. teachers to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to foster globally minded, 21st century world citizens. This review examines empirical research on MTP practices employing technology to prepare teachers for the diverse student populations of 21st century classrooms. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> - This review employs constant comparative method of analysis (Glaser, 1965) to examine empirical research on MTP practices employing technology to prepare teachers for the diverse student populations of 21st century classrooms. Although prior reviews have synthesized research findings on MTP, no systematic investigation has examined the role of technology in preparing teachers to support diverse learners. This review of research conducted from 2002 to 2012 explores how technology has been utilized in MTP to enhance face-to-face, online, and blended teacher preparation experiences. <B>Findings</B> - Collectively, research reviewed illustrates the power of harnessing technological innovation in preparing TCs as multicultural educators increasingly equipped with globally-informed conceptions of diversity and pedagogical approaches for responding to 21st century equity issues – and to support their P-12 students in achieving similar goals. While the types and purposes of technology use in MTP varied across these studies, a trend was found in employing technology to contribute to equitable teaching and learning across international settings. In addition, analyses show study contexts varying from teacher preparation classrooms, to field placement settings, to faculty development workshops, both in the U.S. and abroad.<B>Originality/value</B> - This review encourages schools of education to redefine traditional teacher preparation methods and venture into the technology-shaped worlds of 21st-century students and their teachers. Article literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Laura Blythe Liu, Lottie L. Baker, Natalie B. Milman) Fri, 14 Feb 2014 00:00:00 +0000