Search
  Advanced Search
 
Journal search
Journal cover: Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management

ISSN: 1363-951X
Previously published as: Police Studies: Intnl Review of Police Development
Incorporates: American Journal of Police

Online from: 1997

Subject Area: Industry and Public Sector Management

Content: Latest Issue | icon: RSS Latest Issue RSS | Previous Issues

Options: To add Favourites and Table of Contents Alerts please take a Emerald profile

Previous article.Icon: Print.Table of Contents.Next article.Icon: .

An assessment of South Korean police officers' perceptions of organizational characteristics in the post-reform era


Document Information:
Title:An assessment of South Korean police officers' perceptions of organizational characteristics in the post-reform era
Author(s):Mahesh K. Nalla, (School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA), Wook Kang, (School of Criminal Justice, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Citation:Mahesh K. Nalla, Wook Kang, (2011) "An assessment of South Korean police officers' perceptions of organizational characteristics in the post-reform era", Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, Vol. 34 Iss: 2, pp.326 - 346
Keywords:Job satisfaction, Organizational culture, Police, Police reform, South Korea
Article type:Research paper
DOI:10.1108/13639511111131111 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Acknowledgements:An earlier version of the paper was presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology in Philadelphia, November 2008.
Abstract:

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to develop a broader understanding of police organizational culture in South Korea. More specifically, given its history and culture, the aim is to examine various elements of organizational culture as perceived by line officers and supervisors.

Design/methodology/approach – The data for the present study came from a survey of police officers in South Korea who attended training courses at the Korea National Police University (KNPU), and at the Police Comprehensive Academy (PCA), from June through August of 2008. A total of 406 police officers completed the questionnaires representing an overall return rate of 62 percent.

Findings – The results suggest that, overall, police officers across rank and job assignment were dissatisfied, and at best ambivalent, on all dimensions of organizational culture. Lower ranked police officers, relative to other ranks, appear more dissatisfied with managerial support, open lines of communication, and organizational support. Officers who are part of the police administration (e.g. general affairs, public security, intelligence) are less disenchanted with management support, communication, and innovation than are patrol officers and criminal investigators. This study suggests that both rank and job assignment influences South Korean officers' perceptions of their organizational culture.

Research limitations/implications – This research does not attempt to compare officers' perceptions before and after the Grand Reform, as data are not available for study. In a limited way, it can be interpreted that after over a decade since the implementation of the Grand Reform more work is needed in improving officers' attitudes regarding their organizational climate.

Originality/value – Unlike studies done in the USA, which have de-centralized police forces, this study offers a unique opportunity to examine the organizational culture of a centralized police force. Additionally, this paper examines the extent to which officers' perceptions of police culture are similar along rank, experience, and job assignment variables.



Fulltext Options:

Login

Login

Existing customers: login
to access this document

Login


- Forgot password?
- Athens/Institutional login

Purchase

Purchase

Downloadable; Printable; Owned
HTML, PDF (129kb)Purchase

To purchase this item please login or register.

Login


- Forgot password?

Recommend to your librarian

Complete and print this form to request this document from your librarian


Marked list


Bookmark & share

Reprints & permissions