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Journal cover: Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities

ISSN: 1753-0180
Currently published as: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

Online from: 2007

Subject Area: Health and Social Care

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Randomised controlled trials in learning disabilities: a review of participant experiences


Document Information:
Title:Randomised controlled trials in learning disabilities: a review of participant experiences
Author(s):Daniel Robotham, (Department of Mental Health Sciences, Royal Free & UCL, London UK), Angela Hassiotis, (Department of Mental Health Sciences, Royal Free & UCL, London UK)
Citation:Daniel Robotham, Angela Hassiotis, (2009) "Randomised controlled trials in learning disabilities: a review of participant experiences", Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, Vol. 3 Iss: 1, pp.42 - 46
Keywords:Clinical trials, Learning disabilities, Participant satisfaction, Research ethics, Therapeutic misconception
Article type:General review
DOI:10.1108/17530180200900008 (Permanent URL)
Publisher:Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Abstract:Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the bedrock of evidence-based practice. However, they raise important issues about participant recruitment and the ethics of group allocation. In this article we report relevant literature on how participants with learning disabilities and other stakeholders experience RCTs. Five quantitative studies have been published, one reporting on the views of people with learning disabilities and the remainder on carers' views. Despite the methodological limitations of the studies, carers appear to have a positive experience of RCT participation, and people with learning disabilities are able to understand certain aspects of research methods. We conclude that stakeholders are not hostile to RCTs, but the therapeutic misconception may affect their experiences. Further research is required to investigate interventions that might help promote RCTs in learning disabilities.



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